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University Museum of Bergen

News archive for University Museum of Bergen

There are still a lot of unanswered questions about molluscs. New results published in the recognised scientific journal «Current Biology» reveal that in the marine mollusc Wirenia argentea – a worm-like mollusc that lives on the sea floor – the musculature in the larvae is more complex than that in the adult animals. This points to a complex mollusc ancestor.
On Sunday you are invited to an exciting experience at the University Museum. We go back to the year 1626, to the little village Litladal in Western Norway.
It may be challenging to get an idea of the lie of the land along walking paths and trails far into the woods of the Arboretum. But from now on it will be a lot easier – new signs will make it more attractive for visitors to go for a woodland walk and find their way back again.
Dress up and visit a dimly lit museum, if you dare...
Due to building operations, the Natural History Collections will close on 1 November and will remain closed for several years. If you want to visit the University Museum, the yellow building housing the Cultural History Collections will be the place to go.
Field work is an important activity in the natural history museum. Two series of blogs are reporting from ongoing work in marine environments.
Massive DNA sequencing efforts behind recently published study of mitochondrial genomes in lantern fishes.
Having travelled in a total of 11 countries and 17 different cities, the Museum’s travelling exhibition Deeper than light has now returned to Bergen. It will open on Friday 7 June at the Natural History Collections.
This coming weekend it looks as though the rhododendron cultivars in the Arboretum at Milde will be at the height of blossoming. Welcome to the Arboretum Festival Day this coming Sunday, 2 June.
FREE ENTRY TO BOTH BUILDINGS FOR ALL VISITORS. IN ADDITION, ALL ADULTS WILL BE OFFERED A MUSEUM PASS THAT WILL GIVE THEM FREE ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM FOR THE REMAINDER OF 2013. WHY!
This weekend is your last chance to see the Doctor Proctor exhibition. On Monday 3 June, the exhibition will be taken down. What about combining a museum visit with a visit to the Museum Garden in the wonderful weather we’re having right now?
Who eats museum objects? How are skins for collections prepared? How do we take care of paintings, Viking swords, Arabian coins, mammals, fossils, textiles, and the like? Enter the exciting world of conservation.
This year, the collection of species rhododendrons is in a very different state compared to previous years. The plants are in their protective winter coats, still holding back the seasonal development as long as the night frost is refusing to let go of its grip – and it’s all good.
What was life really like in Ancient Egypt? Listen to the stories about mummies, daily life, and belief systems. Be fascinated by Egypt’s perfumes and scents as well as culinary experiences. On Sunday next, the University Museum is hosting Ancient Egyptian Day.
The University Museum is open on Maundy Thursday 28 March from 11.00 to 16.00. On the remaining Easter holidays, Good Friday, Easter Eve, Easter Sunday and Easter Monday, the Museum will be closed.
Did you know that the University Museum now boils carcasses of animals collected from all over Norway in a new state-of-the-art boiler room? The skeletal material is then incorporated into the Museum’s unique osteological collections, which is a part of the new zoological storage facilities in the Natural Science Building.
What was life like in the Stone Age, what did people eat, and what tools did they use? What did the ancient Egyptians think about life after death?
Every winter some of the trees are cut down to make room for new plantings both in the Arboretum and in the Botanical Garden. This wood is for sale and can be collected at the Arboretum.

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