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GAMUT – Griegakademiets senter for musikkterapiforskning

GAMUT FORSKNINGSPROSJEKT

Samfunnsmusikkterapi

A community music therapy research project conducted at GAMUT developing the links between theory-building and appropriate research strategies looking process and efficacy of context-sensitive projects of collaborative music-making.

Working from a pioneering conception of a culturally sensitive Community Music Therapy the research team will develop links between theory-building and appropriate research strategies looking at both process and efficacy of context-sensitive projects of collaborative music-making. Eight practical projects will take place in four locations (Norway, Israel, South Africa, and England) and will cover a broad range of populations and contexts (from handicapped children in an educational context, to youngsters involved in urban gang activities, to members of a senior choir in a rural community).

A detailed comparative analysis of these projects will be used as the basis for collaborative theory-building and for explorations of appropriate research strategies for this ‘newer’ model of Community Music Therapy. Theory-building initiatives will involve both the development of indigenous theory as well as linking to other informing bodies of knowledge – such as Health Psychology, Cultural Psychology, the ‘New’ Social Psychology of Music – and exploring what theoretical resources are relevant to the theoretical elaboration of Community Music Therapy. The development of appropriate research strategies will involve building a ‘newer’ tradition of research sensitive to the contextual and culture-centred base of the clinical work and theoretical modelling. The concept of Community Music Therapy explicitly forefronts the issues of: cultural context and cultural difference; the relevance of local practice and theory traditions of music therapy within a globalising world; the reflexivity that can be generated from international dialogue.

The project was completed in 2008.

Principal Researchers: Gary Ansdell , Cochavit Elefant, Mercédès Pavlicevic and Brynjulf Stige.