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New handbook:

Handbook on the Governance and Politics of Migration

Associate Professor Regine Paul at the department has just published the Edward Elgar Handbook on "the Governance and Politics of Migration"

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Regine Paul, Associate Professor at the Department of Administration and Organization Theory, has just published the Edward Elgar Handbook on the Governance and Politics of Migration, together with Emma Carmel and Katharina Lenner at the University of Bath/UK. The Handbook sets out an innovative conceptual and analytical framework for the critical appraisal of migration governance in the introduction by the editors. Global and interdisciplinary in scope, the 32 chapters are organized across six key themes: conceptual debates; categorizations of migration; governance regimes; processes; spaces of migration governance; and mobilizations around it.

Leading international contributors critically assess categorizations and conceptualizations of migration to address theoretical concerns including transnationalism and de-colonization, climate change, development, humanitarianism, bordering, technologies and the role of time. They closely examine practices of migration governance and politics, and their effects, across diverse spaces, processes and forms of mobilization. They draw on up-to-date examples from across the globe in order to examine how migrants, whether forced or voluntary, are governed. Reviewing the latest developments in migration governance research through empirically rich and conceptually concise appraisals, the Handbook problematizes orthodox perspectives and discusses how a critical reading can add to our understanding of the governance and politics of migration.

Emma, Katharina and Regine will launch the Handbook officially in the 2021 conference season, i.e. at IMISCOE and the Council for European Studies conferences. Follow @ReginePaul6 on Twitter for scheduling details.

You can read the Handbook’s introduction here.