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Centre for Climate and Energy Transformation (CET)
CET lunch seminar

Recent legal developments and new energy infrastructure

The Bergen Center for Competition Law & Economics (BECCLE) and the Centre for Climate and Energy Transformation (CET) invite you to this smeinar on November 13, 2018 from 10.00 am to 11.30 am at the JUS II Auditorium, located in its ground floor.

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Main content

Technological changes, the eruption of renewable sources and the increase of energy demand by consumers poses several questions concerning the adequacy of power generation and sufficiency and development of energy infrastructures.

To deal with these issues of new energy infrastructure the intervention of the state is common place. Either through the setting of rules, and or the financing of infrastructure projects - publicly and/or privately owned. This state intervention generates economic, political and societal impact which distort the competition between energy suppliers but can also be used to satisfy needs in the public interest.

Prof. Leigh Hancher from the University of Tilburg and the Florence School of Regulation will be visiting the University of Bergen to discuss her views concerning "Recent legal developments and new energy infrastructure", touching aspects such as the adequacy and legality of state financing through state aid, the impact of new rules on gas commercialization and their impact in the Norwegian markets.

On the speaker:

Prof. Hancher is one of the leading specialists in energy law and policy in the European Union. Leigh is Professor of European Law at Tilburg University and Director of the Energy Law and Regulation at the Florence School of Regulation. She has widely published in different aspects of energy regulation and competition with a particular emphasis on energy markets, state aid and regulation. Her latest books are “State Aid and the Energy Sector” (Hart, 2018) “Capacity mechanisms in the EU energy markets: Law, policy and economics” (Oxford University Press, 2015).