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Mare Nullius?

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Read the latest on the Mare Nullius research front
Postdoctoral Fellow Joanna Siekiera reports on a new summer school educating the science diplomats of the future, with participation from around the world.
Biodiversity is one of the key issues in the debate for sustaining and developing our common ocean resources. Law researchers at the University of Bergen have long been engaged in judicial questions outside national marine territories.
Read the latest update on the Mare Nullius research front
Ocean science is at the core of the University of Bergen’s science diplomacy activities. By juxtaposing the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda, the university and its partners are quietly providing policymakers with research-based knowledge for global sustainability.
In October 2018 the University of Bergen was given a lead role on SDG14, Life below water, by United Nations Academic Impact. Now the university has been asked to present a four-part series for inspiration on ocean research and education. The UN distributes the series globally.
The new Norway-Pacific Ocean-Climate Scholarship Programme builds on long-term collaboration between two ocean and climate oriented universities, which includes a voluntary commitment at the inaugural UN Ocean Conference.
In partnership with Palau's UN Mission and IOC-UNESCO, the University of Bergen arranged a side event at Our Ocean to discuss the science necessary to secure marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction as part of international law.
The challenges for the science-policy nexus to succeed were discussed at a side event hosted at Norway's Mission to the UN. The conclusion was that science may not be questioned, but is in danger of being ignored.
The University of Bergen has taken on a leadership role on SDG 14, Life below water, for United Nations Academic Impact, and will act to inspire and motivate partners worldwide to create greater knowledge towards a sustainable ocean.
Social anthropologist Edvard Hviding is one of three University of Bergen researchers to receive five years of major funding from the prestigious Toppforsk programme, awarded by the Research Council of Norway, for his project Mare Nullius.