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Uniting the climate elite

A dream of the UiB´s climate researchers is about to come true. The rehabilitation of the new headquarters for climate research in Bergen has started.

Damian Flores from the Estate and facilities management division of UiB and. Gisle Clemetsen, construction manager at Stoltz Entreprenør, on the roof of Jahnebakken 5. This building will host the climate researchers of Bergen from February 2017.
LIFTING THE ROOF: Damian Flores from the Estate and facilities management division of UiB and. Gisle Clemetsen, construction manager at Stoltz Entreprenør, on the roof of Jahnebakken 5. This building will host the climate researchers of Bergen from February 2017.
Photo:
Solfrid T. Langeland

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“We are tearing down everything inside the building. The only things left are the concrete walls, the floor slabs and the pillars. We are also keeping the characteristic impression of the building,“ says Damian Flores at the Estate and Facilities Management division at the University of Bergen (UiB).

Flores is responsible for the rehabilitation of the UiB building in Jahnebakken 5. In a little more than a year, this will be the building that houses the climate elite in Bergen. The rehabilitation of the 2,600 square meters will come to an end in February 2017.

Millions from the ministry

Plans to unite the climate researchers in Bergen have existed since the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (BCCR) received the status of  a Norwegian Centre of Excellence (SFF) in 2002.

During the last years, specific plans have been formed to locate the climate researchers in the west wing of the Geophysical Institute, which has been empty since 2010. The need to upgrade this building has been crucial. The plans to gather the climate elite finally came true when UiB was granted 35 million Norwegian kroner (NOK) from the Ministry of Education and Research.

Signaling commitment to climate research

BCCR leader Tore Furevik looks forward to gather all the climate researchers in one place.

“The refurbished building will make the dialogue and cooperation easier, but to unite the climate researchers will also have an important signal effect,” says Furevik, who believes this shows how greatly appreciated the centre’s work is by the authorities and Norwegian society outside of academia. BCCR is already well known and respected internationally, due to excellent research since 2002. The Norwegian prime minister Erna Solberg recently brought up the international high standard of the centre within climate research.

“It surprises me how well known the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research is worldwide. We are very excited to continue building our brand as top climate researchers and to host important collaborators in the new building,” says Furevik.