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Christian Løvold Storhaug

Hilde Norborg

PhD Candidate
  • E-mailHilde.Norborg@uib.no
  • Visitor Address
    Haukeland Universitetssykehus Laboratoriebygget, 7. etg. Heis øst
  • Postal Address
    Postboks 7804
    5020 Bergen

In multiple sclerosis (MS), as with other chronic progressive diseases, adherence to disease modifying treatments is often compromised and reported as low as 12–59%. Non-adherence is associated with lower quality of life and higher relapse rates, health care expenses and disease burden compared to patients with high adherence. Medication switches due to lack of adherence, treatment failure or side effects often occur among patients with MS even though it increases the risk of disease breakthrough. 

Dimethyl fumarate is a common first line treatment option in multiple sclerosi. However, major differences in discontinuation rates among patients with MS treated with dimethyl fumarate have been found. This variation is also apparent between similar patient cohorts in different MS clinics. It has been suggested that the varying discontinuation rates from different clinics could be due to the distinctive management approaches in each clinic and among the health care professionals rather than differences in the MS cohort. 

In this study we estimate and compare drug discontinuation rates of dimethyl fumarate and look into reasons for discontinuation on a local, national and international level. We specifically look into the influence of standard of care on the discontinuation rates, in order to identify if any organizational factors lower the risk of discontinuing treatment. 

Academic article
  • Show author(s) 2021. Real-world discontinuation rate of teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Experimental, Translational and Clinical. 1-10.

More information in national current research information system (CRIStin)

In multiple sclerosis (MS), as with other chronic progressive diseases, adherence to disease modifying treatments is often compromised and reported as low as 12–59%. Non-adherence is associated with lower quality of life and higher relapse rates, health care expenses and disease burden compared to patients with high adherence. Medication switches due to lack of adherence, treatment failure or side effects often occur among patients with MS even though it increases the risk of disease breakthrough. 

Dimethyl fumarate is a common first line treatment option in multiple sclerosi. However, major differences in discontinuation rates among patients with MS treated with dimethyl fumarate have been found. This variation is also apparent between similar patient cohorts in different MS clinics. It has been suggested that the varying discontinuation rates from different clinics could be due to the distinctive management approaches in each clinic and among the health care professionals rather than differences in the MS cohort. 

In this study we estimate and compare drug discontinuation rates of dimethyl fumarate and look into reasons for discontinuation on a local, national and international level. We specifically look into the influence of standard of care on the discontinuation rates, in order to identify if any organizational factors lower the risk of discontinuing treatment.