Home
Kevin McCafferty's picture

Kevin McCafferty

Professor
  • E-mailKevin.McCafferty@uib.no
  • Phone+47 55 58 31 50
  • Visitor Address
    HF-bygget, Sydnesplassen 7
  • Postal Address
    Postboks 7805
    5020 Bergen
Academic article
  • 2017. Irish English in emigrant letters. World Englishes. 176-190.
  • 2015. ‘I was away in another field got’: a diachronic study of the be-perfect in Irish English. Token: A Journal of English Linguistics. 135-161.
  • 2014. ‘[The Irish] find much difficulty in these auxiliaries […], putting will for shall with the first person’: The decline of first-person shall in Ireland, 1760-1890. English Language and Linguistics. 407-429.
  • 2014. 'I dont care one cent what [Ø] goying on in Great Britten': BE-deletion in Irish English. American Speech. 441-469.
  • 2012. Linguistic identity and the study of emigrant letters: Irish English in the making. Lengua y migración. 5-24.
  • 2011. Victories fastened in grammar: historical documentation of Irish English. English Today. 17-24.
  • 2011. Fictionalising orality: introduction. Sociolinguistic Studies. 1-13.
  • 2005. William Carleton between Irish and English: using literary dialect to study language contact and change. Language and Literature. 339-362.
  • 2004. Innovation in language contact: Be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English. Diachronica. 113-160.
  • 2004. Innovation in language contact : Be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English, 1670 to the present. Diachronica. 113-160.
  • 2004. '[T]hunder storms is verry dangese in this countrey they come in less than a minnits notice...': The Northern Subject Rule in Southern Irish English. English World-Wide. 51-79.
  • 2004. "Thunder storms is verry dangese in this countrey they come in less than a minnits notice <...>": The northern subject rule in Southern Irish English. English World-Wide. 51-79.
  • 2003. The Northern Subject Rule in Ulster: How Scots, how English? Language Variation and Change. 105-139.
  • 2002. Sure how would the (imminent) future ever be after becoming the (recent) past? Change in the Irish English be after V-ing construction. ERIC Database of Educational Documents. 32 pages.
  • 2002. Plural verbal -s in nineteenth-century Ulster: Scots and English influence on Ulster dialects. Ulster folklife. 62-86.
  • 1999. Citizens and tribesmen. Two 'nations' in the siege narrative of Ulster Unionist rhetoric. Nordlit. 71-86.
  • 1998. Shared accents, divided speech community? Change in Northern Ireland English. Language Variation and Change. 97-121.
  • 1998. Barriers to change: Ethnic division and phonological innovation in Northern Ireland English. English World-Wide. 7-32.
  • 1994. No Prods or Fenians here! The absence of Northern Ireland social organisation in sociolinguistic studies. Nordlyd. 1-32.
Report
  • 2011. Fictionalising Orality. 1. 1. .
Lecture
  • 2017. ‘I fancy I am speaking to you verbaly while I am writing this scroll to you’: using personal letters to study earlier Irish English.
Popular scientific lecture
  • 2015. Stories of migration: the Young Irelanders.
  • 2011. An unruly wash of English, Scots and Irish. Exploring (London)Derry English.
  • 2007. The English language - how Germanic, how Celtic?
Academic lecture
  • 2018. ‘[T]his is the only spare Coppy I have got’: Stative possessive HAVE in eighteenth- to twentieth-century Ireland.
  • 2018. Innovations in stative possessive HAVE in older Irish English.
  • 2017. ‘I Ø Sorry to Say I owe Meny Shilling’: BE-deletion in 18th- and early 19th-century Irish English.
  • 2016. ‘I am sure you know not what I mean’: variable negation in late eighteenth-century Irish English.
  • 2016. "Sure they won't forget you there no more than at home": Exploring the history of sure as a pragmatic marker in Irish English.
  • 2015. ‘I Ø hoping this will find you all in the same [good health]’: Be-deletion in Irish English, 1731–1840.
  • 2015. ' I Ø hoping this will find you all in the same [good health]': Be-deletion in Irish English, 1731-1840.
  • 2014. "So now dear mother do not give yourself the least unnecessary anxiety about me": Pragmatic markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence.
  • 2014. "But sure Robert Greer is to be married in the course of a month": the use of sure as a discourse marker in Irish English.
  • 2013. ‘Sure this is a great country for drink and rowing at elections’: discourse markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence.
  • 2013. ‘Sure he has been talking about coming for the last year or two’: the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence and the use of discourse markers.
  • 2013. ‘I suppose like the folks in America are doing well’: Pragmatic markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence.
  • 2013. ‘I dont care one cent what Ø goying on in great Britten’: be-deletion in Irish English, 1730-1840.
  • 2013. ‘Everything is changed’: The be-perfect in Irish English, 1700-1940.
  • 2013. ‘Everything is changed’ The be-perfect in Irish English, 1700-1940.
  • 2013. ‘But Mother like, she thinks justice has not been done them’: Pragmatic markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence.
  • 2013. The voice of the Irish emigrant: private correspondence and the development of Irish English.
  • 2013. Panel debate on corpus annotation.
  • 2011. Using emigrant letters to study the evolution of Irish English.
  • 2011. Irish English in the 1830s and 40s. A preliminary survey.
  • 2010. Using letter corpora to investigate geographical variation: the progressive in Irish English.
  • 2010. Using letter corpora to investigate geographical variation: the progressive in Irish English.
  • 2010. The north is different? The history of Northern Irish English.
  • 2010. Celtic revenge in English grammar? The preservation and spread of future will in Irish English.
  • 2010. CORIECOR. A Corpus of Irish English Correspondence, c. 1700-1900. Compiling and using a diachronic corpus to study the evolution of Irish English.
  • 2010. Belfastards and Derriers: Urban Northern Irish English.
  • 2010. 'I will be expecting a letter from you before this reaches you'. Studying the evolution of a new-dialect using a Corpus of Irish English Correspondence (CORIECOR).
  • 2010. 'I shall/will write soon again': A diachronic study of will and shall in Irish English.
  • 2009. The BOARDER question in Northern Irish English. Rural influence on urban varieties.
  • 2009. '[H]e was wanting him to go to Comber[...]': A corpus-based diachronic study of the progressive in Irish English.
  • 2008. Belfastards and Derriers - culchies at heart? Urban and rural influences in Northern Irish English.
  • 2007. 'Preserv[ing] every thing Irish'? The Irish English dialect of William Carleton's peasants.
  • 2007. 'Not just another variety of Hiberno-English?' The Irishness of northern speech.
  • 2006. On the trail of ‘intolerable Scoto-Hibernic jargon’. Irish English, Ulster English and dialect hygiene in William Carleton’s Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry (First series, 1830).
  • 2004. William Carleton´s "The Donagh,or The Horse Stealers".
  • 2004. Carleton's language in 'The Donagh, or the Horse stealers'.
  • 2004. Carleton's language in "The Donagh, or The Horse Stealers".
  • 2004. Be after V-ing on the past grammaticalisation path. How far is it after coming?
  • 2004. 'A truly Hibernian spirit'? Evidence of language contact and change in William Carleton's literary dialect.
  • 2004. "A truly hiberian spirit?" Evidence of language contact and change in William Carleton's literary dialect.
  • 2003. The Northern Subject Rule in Ulster dialects: Scots and English influence on Northern Irish English.
  • 2002. An Electronic Atlas of Irish English. Northern Irish English phonology: research past and yet to come.
  • 2001. Case study: Language planning in Norway and Northern Ireland - Consensus and diversity.
  • 2001. 'I'll bee after telling dee de raison...': be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English, 1601-1750.
  • 2000. Sure how would the (imminent) future ever be after becoming the (recent) past? Change in the Irish English be after v-ing construction.
  • 1998. Citizens and tribesmen. Two views of the nation in the use of the siege narrative in Ulster Unionist rhetoric.
  • 1997. Shared accents in a divided speech community? A comparative sociolinguistic approach to Derry/Londonderry English.
  • 1996. Pacing changes. Ethnic segregation as a brake on phonological innovation in Northern Hiberno-English.
  • 1996. Pacing changes, facing divisions. Discourses of ethnic division in Northern Ireland.
  • 1996. Culture and language in the North of Ireland.
  • 1996. 'Besieged within the siege'. Discourses of ethnic division in Northern Ireland.
  • 1995. Voicing differences. Variation and change in Derry/Londonderry English in relation to ethnicity, class, and sex.
  • 1994. Beyond the 'h-test. Ethnic differentiation in Northern Hiberno-English.
Book review
  • 2016. Review of Nicholas M. Wolf. An Irish-speaking island. State, religion, community, and the linguistic landscape in Ireland, 1770-1870. Madison, University of Wisconsin Press. Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics. 137-141.
  • 2016. Review of Jeffrey L. Kallen, Irish English, volume 2: The Republic of Ireland. Berlin, De Gruyter. English World-Wide. 86-90.
  • 2011. Southern Irish English: Review and Exemplary Texts. English World-Wide. 379-383.
  • 2011. Review of Séamas Moylan. 2008. Southern Irish English: Review and Exemplary Texts. Dublin: Geography Publications. English World-Wide. 379-383.
  • 2011. Review of Karen P. Corrigan. 2010. Irish English, Volume 1 - Northern Ireland. Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press. English World-Wide. 250-254.
  • 2011. Irish English. vol 1-Northern Ireland. English World-Wide. 250-255.
  • 2002. John M. Kirk and Dónall P. Ó Baoill, eds. 2000. Language and politics: Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, and Scotland. (Belfast Studies in Language, Culture and Politics 1.) Belfast Cló Ollscoil na Banríona/Queen's University Press. 147pp. English World-Wide. 137-151.
Academic anthology/Conference proceedings
  • 2015. Pragmatic markers in Irish English. John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  • 2014. 'Ye whom the charms of grammar please': Studies in English Language History in Honour of Leiv Egil Breivik. Peter Lang Publishing Group.
  • 2005. Contexts - historical, social, linguistic. Studies in celebration of Toril Swan. Peter Lang Publishing Group.
  • 2005. Contexts - Historical, Social, Linguistic. Studies in Celebration of Toril Swan. Peter Lang Publishing Group.
  • 2005. Contexts - Historical, Social, Linguistic. Peter Lang Publishing Group.
Academic monograph
  • 2001. Ethnicity and language change. English in (London)Derry, Northern Ireland.
Compendium
  • 2006. English intonation.
Thesis at a second degree level
  • 2003. Caught in the line of bonfires. A close textual reading of Glenn Patterson's Burning your own.
  • 1997. Mutual understanding? An investigation of Northern Ireland political discourse.
Masters thesis
  • 2020. Language, Race, and Black Identity in Twenty-First Century America: A corpus study of contemporary U.S. discourse on race in the (non-fictional) writings by Ta-Nehisi Coates.
  • 2020. "And what have you thought o' what you are seen o' Shetland so far?": A sociolinguistic study of language variation and change in Scalloway, Shetland.
  • 2019. Teen Language: ‘Ikke si “joine” det er cringe’: A sociolinguistic study of Norwegian teenagers’ use of English in written computer-mediated communication.
  • 2019. Fucks, shits, and twunts: A sociolinguistic study of the use of and attitudes towards swear words in York.
  • 2018. Tunisians' attitudes towards English and its use in the Tunisian context: a sociolinguistic attitudinal study.
  • 2018. The written evidence of Early Modern English pronunciation.
  • 2018. Shaping the discourse of gender-neutral pronouns in English: a study of attitudes and use in Australia.
  • 2018. Investigating the ‘multiethnolectality’ of MLE as expressed in grime lyrics.
  • 2017. Variable negation in late 19th-century Irish English.
  • 2017. American, British or Norwegian English? A phonological analysis of songs by Norwegian singers sung in English.
  • 2016. ‘I would say [k]ar, yeah. [kʲ]ar, yeah’: Phonological variation and change in Portadown.
  • 2015. ‘We have had very Pearlous times and lost Much But through Devine Providence is Blessed with sufficient of the Nessarys of Life’: A study of subject-verb concord in 18th -century Ulster.
  • 2011. The use of shall and will in Irish English - a corpus-based diachronic socio-linguistic variation study.
  • 2011. Freebooters, yachts, and pickle-herrings: Dutch nautical, maritime, and naval loanwords in English.
  • 2010. Language status and attitude: A study of senior high school students' motivation and attitudes towards English language and indigenous Ghanaian languages.
  • 2010. "Sure it wouldn't be right". Sure as a discourse marker in A Corpus of Irish English from the 18th to the 20th century.
  • 2009. Michty me, whit are ye gassin' aboot? The use of Scots in the newspaper comic strips The Broons and Oor Wullie.
  • 2007. 'It's na mate'. Glaswegian grammar revisited. A sociolinguistic study of standard and non-standard negation in a Scottish variety.
  • 2007. 'He say that girls likes him...'. A study of Norwegian learners' subject-verb concord behavior.
  • 2006. "I'ma do things differently": I'ma and the Grammaticalization of going to in AAVE.
Popular scientific article
  • 1996. Frae 'wile norn aksints' tae oor ain national leid? Part 2. Causeway. Cultural Traditions Journal. 48-53.
  • 1996. Frae 'wile norn aksints' tae oor ain national leid? Part 1. Causeway. Cultural Traditions Journal. 39-44.
  • 1995. Runagates revisited: or, 'even English in these airts took a lawless turn'. Causeway. Cultural Traditions Journal. 9-15.
Feature article
  • 2005. William Carleton´s Mediations: Representing Language and Culture in "The Donagh; or the Horse Stealers". Conference Proceedings, NAES, 2004. 26 pages.
Doctoral dissertation
  • 2016. ‘[S]ince we came across the Atalantic’: An empirical diachronic study of Northern Irish English phonology.
  • 2016. "There is a great many Irish Settlers here". Exploring Irish English diachronically using emigrant letters in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence (CORIECOR).
  • 1997. Open minds, barricaded tongues. A study of ethnic relations and language change in Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
Programme participation
  • 2004. Turning the word.
  • 2004. Turning the word.
  • 2004. Turning the word.
  • 2004. Turning the word.
  • 2004. Turning the word.
  • 2000. The routes of English 3.
Academic chapter/article/Conference paper
  • 2019. ‘but a[h] Hellen d[ea]r sure you have it more in your power in every respect than I have’ – Discourse marker sure in Irish English. 21 pages.
  • 2019. 'I have not time to say more at present': Negating lexical HAVE in Irish English. 20 pages.
  • 2016. Migration databases as impact tools in the education and heritage sectors. 43 pages.
  • 2016. Emigrant letters: exploring the 'grammar of the conquered'. 26 pages.
  • 2015. Pragmatic markers in Irish English: Introduction. 16 pages.
  • 2015. '[B]ut sure its only a penny after all': Irish English discourse marker sure. 19 pages.
  • 2015. "Sure this is a great country for drink and rowing at elections": Discourse markers in the Corpus of Irish English Correspondence, 1750-1940. 22 pages.
  • 2014. Preface: Charms of grammar/Source of all glamour. 1 pages.
  • 2014. I think I will be after making love to one of them: A revised account of Irish English be after V-ing and its Irish source. 25 pages.
  • 2014. '[W]ell are you not got over thinking about going to ireland yet': the BE-perfect in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Irish English. 19 pages.
  • 2012. Belfastards and Derriers - culchies at heart? Urban and rural influences in Northern Irish English. 26 pages.
  • 2012. A Corpus of Irish English Correspondence (CORIECOR): A tool for studying the history and evolution of Irish English. 23 pages.
  • 2012. "I will be expecting a letter from you before this reaches you". A corpus-based study of shall/will variation in Irish English correspondence. 26 pages.
  • 2011. English grammar, Celtic revenge? First-person future shall/will in Irish English. 20 pages.
  • 2010. '[H]ushed and lulled full chimes for pushed and pulled': Writing Ulster English. 24 pages.
  • 2009. "Preserv[ing] every thing Irish"? The Hiberno-English dialect of William Carleton's peasants. 33 pages.
  • 2008. On the trail of "intolerable Scoto-Hibernic jargon": Ulster English, Irish English and dialect hygiene in William Carleton's Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry (First Series, 1830). 14 pages.
  • 2007. Northern Irish English. 13 pages.
  • 2006. Be after V-ing on the past grammaticalisation path: how far is it after coming? 22 pages.
  • 2005. Preface. 9 pages.
  • 2005. Preface. 9 pages.
  • 2005. Preface. 8 pages.
  • 2005. Future, perfect and past. Changing uses of be after V-ing in Irish English. 13 pages.
  • 2005. 'His letters is as short as ever they were': the Northern Subject Rule in 19th-century Ireland. 15 pages.
  • 2003. Language contact in Early Modern Ireland: the case of be after V-ing as a future gram. 19 pages.
  • 2003. 'I'll bee after telling dee de raison ...': Be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English, 1601-1750. 20 pages.
  • 2001. Norway: consensus and diversity. 15 pages.
  • 1999. (London)Derry: between Ulster and local speech - class, ethnicity and language change. 19 pages.
  • 1996. Voicing differences. Variation and change in Derry/Londonderry English in relation to ethnicity, class, ans sex. 20 pages.
Academic literature review
  • 2003. Plural verbal -s in nineteenth-century Ulster: Scots and English influence on Ulster dialects. 62-86.

More information in national current research information system (CRIStin)