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  • E-mailMarit.R.Bjerke@uib.no
  • Phone+47 55 58 22 04+47 928 01 852
  • Visitor Address
    Øysteins gate 3
    5007 Bergen
  • Postal Address
    Postboks 7805
    5020 Bergen

My research interests lie within the environmental humanities, with a focus on biodiversity loss and climate change. I am especially interested in how different environmental problems are understood and presented in political texts, mass media and popular science, and how understandings of different environmental problems intertwine. My background is in marine biology (phd), history of ideas (master), and cultural studies (postdoc).

I am currently part of the project "Gardening the Globe: Historicizing the Anthropocene through the production of socio-nature in Scandinavia, 1750-2020”, which started up in December 2021. The project is funded by the Research Council of Norway. As part of the project, I explore the management of so-called "invasive alien species" - species that have been moved by humans to places where they do not occur naturally. I examine how authorities navigate the tension between stopping an ecological threat and developing an economic resource, and how different scales and scalings - such as species versus strain - are used. I also examine what kind of valuation of nature eradication of alien invasive species entails.

From 2017 to 2021, I was part of the project The future is now: Temporality and exemplarity in climate change discourses. Here, I explored how the relationship between climate change and biological diversity is conveyed in mass media and popular science.

Academic article
  • Show author(s) (2020). Miss Hare Struggles: How Examples of Species Threatened with Extinction Tell a Story of Climate Change. Ethnologia Scandinavica. A Journal for Nordic Ethnology. 187-202.
  • Show author(s) (2019). The past as a mirror: Deep time climate change exemplarity in the anthropocene. Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research. 330-352.
  • Show author(s) (2019). Making Invisible Changes Visible: Animal Examples and the Communication of Biodiversity Loss . Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research. 394-414.
  • Show author(s) (2018). Hvor ble det av naturens egenverdi? Nytt Norsk Tidsskrift. 7-21.
  • Show author(s) (2004). Effects of temperature and salinity on growth, reproduction and survival in the introduced red alga Heterosiphonia japonica (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Botanica Marina. 373-380.
  • Show author(s) (2003). Epiphytes on the invasive species Sargassum muticum at Verdens Ende, South Norway. Sarsia. 353-364.
Editorial
  • Show author(s) (2019). Introduction: Exemplifying Climate Change. Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research. 298-305.
Book review
  • Show author(s) (2021). Forvillede vekster og utemmede dyr. Salongen – nettidsskrift for filosofi og idéhistorie.
Academic anthology/Conference proceedings
  • Show author(s) (2021). Climate Change Temporalities. Explorations in Vernacular, Popular and Scientific Discourse. Routledge.
Popular scientific article
  • Show author(s) (2020). Inne i en sjette masseutryddelse? Tid og fremtidsforestillinger i formidlingen av tap av biologisk mangfold . Salongen – nettidsskrift for filosofi og idéhistorie.
  • Show author(s) (2018). Å sette (antropo)scenen selv: Klimakrise, teknologi og møter med naturen . Forfatternes Klimaaksjon §112 Nettside..
  • Show author(s) (2016). Cloaca Maxima i Roma: En to tusen år gammel kloakkledning og dens beundrere. Vann. 405-408.
Feature article
  • Show author(s) (2018). Hvor ble det av naturens egenverdi? . Morgenbladet.
Doctoral dissertation
  • Show author(s) (2004). Molecular and ecological studies on introduced marine macroalgae in Norwegian waters.
Academic chapter/article/Conference paper
  • Show author(s) (2022). Little Red Ring Binders: Early Red List Temporalities. 25 pages.
  • Show author(s) (2021). The sixth extinction: naming time in a new way. 16 pages.
  • Show author(s) (2021). Our World is dew: Tor Åge Bringsværd's fable Prose as a Chthulucenic Experience. 14 pages.
  • Show author(s) (2021). Living the climate change. 6 pages.
Museum exhibition
  • Show author(s) (2019). Tidens natur.
Popular scientific chapter/article
  • Show author(s) (2021). Dekolonisere stillehavsøsters. 160-166.

More information in national current research information system (CRIStin)

I am currently part of the interdisciplinary project "Gardening the Globe: Historicizing the Anthropocene through the production of socio-nature in Scandinavia, 1750-2020”, which is funded by the Research Council of Norway. I am part of the project management and lead the thematic work package "Moving nature".

GARDENING THE GLOBE aims to examine historical processes through which nature has been conquered, controlled and commodified in Scandinavia from the mid-18th century to the present. Today's environmental problems are often presented with the help of scientific concepts from Earth Systems science and geology - such as the term Anthropocene. Although such concepts are important for highlighting humanity’s impact on the planet as a whole, they also seem to make factors such as historical conditions, social structures and cultural values​​ invisible. There is therefore a need for a broader understanding of how the practices and technologies that have led to today's environmental problems are historically situated. GARDENING will study these historical processes as a series of increasingly intense attempts to conquer, control and utilize nature - that is, the production of what we call "socio-nature".

The project will investigate cases related to three themes: 1) processes of moving animals, plants and minerals; 2) practices of eradicating organisms; and 3) the human production of landscapes. The cases include management of alien species, the use of rotenone in Scandinavian rivers, the concept of “nature's economy”, Danish pig farms, Swedish mining landscapes, urban gardening, “the green shift”, and man-made geological land formations.

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From 2017 to 2021, I was part of the project The future is now: Temporality and exemplarity in climate change discourses.