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Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre and Research Group
ITP after LDN use in a patient with MS

New study: Treatment-resistant immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with LDN use in a patient with MS

Researchers at KGJ Centre for MS Research has published an article on a case of therapy-resistant immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) after LDN use in a patient with MS in Neurology: Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation.

Naltrexone is an opiate µ-receptor antagonist approved for treatment of alcohol dependency at a recommended dose of 50 mg/day. The mechanism of action is proposed to be mediated by a normalization of endogenous endorphin levels. Despite few and inconclusive studies (casuistic or open-label), a naltrexone dose of 3–5 mg/day (low-dose naltrexone, LDN) has been suggested to ameliorate a wide range of diseases, especially Crohn disease1 and multiple sclerosis (MS).2 Its effect in these conditions is mainly advocated by patients via both formal and informal networks. Reluctance among physicians to prescribe naltrexone has encouraged illegal import. Based on safety data from initial marketing studies conducted in the 1970s, naltrexone has generally been considered safe, with no serious side effects or adverse events. We present a case of therapy-resistant immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) after LDN use in a patient with MS.

Referanse:
Torkildsen Ø, Myhr KM, Wergeland S. Treatment resistant immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with low-dose naltrexone use in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Neurology: Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation. Epub 21.08.14 :e25.