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Arnesen lab

The eukaryotic NAT-machinery

Protein N-terminal acetylation

From molecular mechanisms to human disease

Most proteins are chemically modified in the cell and such modifications are often crucial for the protein’s ability to carry out a function. N-terminal acetylation one of the most common modifications in eukaryotes. It is catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) which are linked to cancer, genetic syndromes, and regulation of human metabolism.

The Arnesen lab is part of the Translational Cell Signaling and Metabolism research group at the Department of biomedicine.

Award
To forskningsartikkler stemplet med Best paper 2018

Paper of the year 2018

Two PNAS articles from the Arnesen lab are elected as the best publication of the year 2018 at the Faculty of Medicine. The prize will be awarded at the Faculty Day on 13 June 2019.

New Research
Impaired function of the NAA10 R83H variant

A novel pathological variant of the acetyltransferase NAA10 causes disabilities

N-terminal acetylation is a very common protein modification and NAA10 is the major responsible enzyme in human cells. Here we found a novel pathological NAA10 variant, NAA10 p. (R83H), in two boys with developmental delay and intellectual disabilities.

Technology
Master student med laptop

Cellular espionage in the NAT cell lab

As the first lab in Norway, the NAT lab recently installed a HoloMonitor system for 3D live cell microscopy. This novel instrument allows us to spy on the cells in a gentle and non-invasive way.

New paper
NAA10 - A Jack-of-all-trades protein in human cells

A Jack of all Trades in Cancer Cells

Cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of factors gone wrong in the cell. NAA10 may be one such factor. This is a protein that performs many different tasks, including the most common which is catalyzing the acetylation of cellular proteins. NAA10 can therefore be viewed as a ”Jack of all...

New research
Hunger is not a hindrance for N-terminal acetylation

Hunger is not a hindrance for N-terminal acetylation

Arnesen Lab reveals that the global level of N-terminal acetylation, a highly abundant protein modification in eukaryotes, remains stable in starving yeast cells despite an overall decrease in the cellular level of acetyl-CoA. The findings, described in the December issue of Molecular & Cellular...