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Phylogenetic Systematics and Evolution

News archive for Phylogenetic Systematics and Evolution

In theory, the genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation can be dramatic in animals. Decrease of habitat patch size and increase of patch isolation of local population might lead to smaller populations and more isolation. Such fragmented populations are expected to have less gene flow (i.e. sexual contact among different populations) and more genetic drift (i.e. the change in the frequency of... Read more
The Natural History Museum building must now remain closed indefinitely as the Norwegian government did not provide funding for the completion of the Museum Project in the Revised Fiscal Budget for 2015.
Researchers from the University Museum of Bergen have gathered and published information about the bubble shell in Species Online.
Spring is in the air- many spring flowers are in full bloom in the Botanical Garden at Milde.
In a newly published paper, Steffen Roth and colleagues are summarizing the current knowledge about the most recently discovered insect order Mantophasmatodea.
A museum work-shop in phylogenetic biogeography was a great inspiration for researchers and Ph.D. students.
Massive DNA sequencing efforts behind recently published study of mitochondrial genomes in lantern fishes.
Agriculture is usually regarded as a unique human feature, and one that is contingent on social structures. But there are also insects that are dedicated farmers who rely on cultivated fungi - a great evolutionary success under warm and moist conditions.
In the June issue of the prestigious scientific journal Systematic Biology, Steffen Roth of the University Museum of Bergen and German research collaborators have jointly published a new study of insect systematics based on neurohormones.
An international group of mollusc specialists recently teamed up to survey Brazilian coasts for sea slugs. They were also able to observe spectacular zoological "by-catch".
The Norwegian-Swedish Research School in Biosystematics announces its first annual meeting in Bergen February 1-2, 2011.
The Michael Sars Expedition in 1910 occupies a central place in Norwegian and international history of marine science.