Home

Ecological and Environmental Change Research Group

Landscape at Rondane with a sampling plot marked out and a person looking through binoculars

Multi-disciplinary research with a long time-scale perspective

The major research theme of the EECRG is to study how, and why, natural ecosystems change over space and time. Our primary goal is to 'reconstruct the past, study the present, and model the future' and to study, quantify, and understand the natural variability of ecosystems and the multi-layered impact of human activity.

We use a wide range or research methods, including field and laboratory experiments, ecological surveys, biogeographical approaches, palaeoecology and palaeoclimatology, and we analyse our data using quantitative and qualitative methods, predictive modelling, and spatial approaches.

Our research forms links between 'pure' and 'applied' science and it has relevance for biodiversity science, nature conservation and environmental concerns.

Palaeoecology
Cycles of forcings and responses inferred from proxy records covering the last 1.74 million years

Secrets from a very long interglacial sequence

As part of an international consortium led by Yan Zhao (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing), Vivian Felde and John Birks were involved in the publication of a detailed record of past vegetation and climate over the last 1.74 million years from the Tibetan Plateau.

Grubb review
A peaty landscape showing the exposed remains of fossil pine stumps

Contributions of Quaternary botany to modern ecology and biogeography

John Birks spent a total of 22 months starting in October 2016 writing this monograph as a Grubb Review.

Two students surveying heathland vegetation next to a fjord

Masters Studies with EECRG

We have a number of interesting projects for Masters students to get involved with and provide good support and academic and social meetings to participate in.

A cultural landscape with inset images of cormorant, tardigarde, sampling quadrat, red fungus, blue gentian, admiral butterfly, Grimmia moss, and puffin

Biodiversity-related research

One of the fundamental goals of ecology is to uncover the processes controlling the patterns of diversity and abundance that we observe in nature. How does diversity emerge, and how is it maintained? The EECRG seeks to develop empirical approaches that test and quantify the relative importance of...

View of the Gongga Mountains and glacier

Climate-related research

Humans are putting increasing pressures on the world's ecosystems. We are already seeing strong impacts of habitat loss and changes in nutrient cycling whereas climate change is likely to have increasingly strong impacts during the next century. These current trends can only be understood with...