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Arnesen lab

The eukaryotic NAT-machinery

Protein N-terminal acetylation

From molecular mechanisms to human disease

Most proteins are chemically modified in the cell and such modifications are often crucial for the protein’s ability to carry out a function. N-terminal acetylation one of the most common modifications in eukaryotes. It is catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) which are linked to cancer, genetic syndromes, and regulation of human metabolism.

The Arnesen lab is part of the Translational Cell Signaling and Metabolism research group at the Department of biomedicine.

New paper
NAA10 - A Jack-of-all-trades protein in human cells

A Jack of all Trades in Cancer Cells

Cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of factors gone wrong in the cell. NAA10 may be one such factor. This is a protein that performs many different tasks, including the most common which is catalyzing the acetylation of cellular proteins. NAA10 can therefore be viewed as a ”Jack of all...

Research Highlights
de tre forskerne på laboratoriet

Putting a break on cell movement

These researchers have made a sensational finding in cell biology. Adrian Drazic, Henriette Aksnes and Michaël Marie from Thomas Arnesen's group found an enzyme that others have been looking for for 30 years.

New research
Hunger is not a hindrance for N-terminal acetylation

Hunger is not a hindrance for N-terminal acetylation

Arnesen Lab reveals that the global level of N-terminal acetylation, a highly abundant protein modification in eukaryotes, remains stable in starving yeast cells despite an overall decrease in the cellular level of acetyl-CoA. The findings, described in the December issue of Molecular & Cellular...

Research report
jente med såpebobler

A mutation that can cause autism

Read a summary of how researchers from UiB investigate new genetic variants associated with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and congenital abnomalies.

Review article
Shoes in garden

Actin Modifications: Finding the Right Shoe for Cinderella

Cinderella is a tale of being lifted from obscurity to recognition and significance. A review by young researchers at the Department of Biomedicine highlights the importance of the post-translational modifications of actin.