Home

Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Horizons lecture - in collaboration with HiB, NHH and Energiforum

Future Energy Needs and Engineering Reality - Horizons lecture by Michael Kelly

If we are setting out to decarbonise the world economy, we should set out as if we mean to succeed, and not, as now, take actions that will certainly not succeed.

colourbox12082660.jpg

Solcellepaneler og en mann med en klokke
Photo:
Colourbox

The lecture (held in english)

The climate science community has convinced many policymakers and politicians of the need to decarbonise the world economy in short order. Their case, and whether it is credible or not, is not the issue in this presentation, but rather some of the lessons of the recent history of technology evolution that should not be lost in the rush.

There are rules concerning the introduction of new technologies, and there are penalties for flouting them. If we are setting out to decarbonise the world economy, we should set out as if we mean to succeed, and not, as now, take actions that will certainly not succeed. 


Refreshments will be served before the lecture, which starts at 16.15 pm at VilVite, on Tuesday 5th of May. Everybody is welcome!


Find the event on Facebook


Organisers of this lecture are UiB, HiB, NHH and Energiforum.

 

Professor Michael Kelly

Professor Michael Kelly is the Prince Philip Professor of Technology in the University of Cambridge since 2002, and a Professorial Fellow at Trinity Hall. He was also Chief Scientific Advisor to the Department for Communities and Local Government, and a non-executive director of the Laird Group plc, both from July 2006.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Royal Society of New Zealand. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics, Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and Senior Member of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering in the USA. He has won prizes for his work from the Institute of Physics, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Royal Society.