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The Department of Biomedicine

Biomedical research is developing biological concepts and methods, helps to clarify disease mechanisms and is central to the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics.

The Department of Biomedicine holds one of the largest biomedical research communities in Norway and is of significant size in an international context.

At the Department of Biomedicine we train students and researchers in the fields of:

  • neuroscience
  • physiology
  • protein biology
  • cancer
  • nanotechnology
  • tooth development
  • neuropsychiatric disorders
  • cell biology

Master's theses          PhD Research school          Research groups      Core facilities        BBB Seminars

Confocal course 2018

14th MIC Confocal Microscopy Course

Open for registration, deadline 23rd of February.

Research

Women with ADHD often develop anxiety and depression

Compared with adult men with ADHD, adult ADHD women have an increased risk of experiencing anxiety and depression, shows a new UiB study. Men with ADHD in contrast suffer more from substance abuse and schizophrenia.

News

Millions to research for discovering new antibiotics

Ruth Brenk at The Department of biomedicine received a grant of 7 million NOK for research to discover new antibiotics. The work will be carried out with collaborators at the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology.

Research

Strong association between ADHD and sleep disorders

People who are diagnosed with ADHD report more sleep problems – 15 times more so for certain types of sleep disorders than others without the diagnosis. “These are surprisingly large differences”, says the UiB-researcher behind the study.

Research

An old drug may prevent cancer

A new study performed at UiB shows that the blood-thinning drug warfarin may prevent the development of cancer

Core Facilities

MIC (Microscopic Imaging Centre)
PROBE (Proteomics Unit at the University of Bergen)
BiSS (Biophysics, Structural Biology, and Screening) 

Core facilities that are open to any higher education institution in Norway. The idea behind the core facility concept is to make sophisticated scientific equipment and highly specialized personnel available to a wide range of users. In turn, core facility users contribute financially to operational expenses through paying a set fee for services rendered.