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Rita Pedersen's picture

Rita Pedersen

Head Engineer
  • E-mailRita.Pedersen@uib.no
  • Visitor Address
    Ă…rstadveien 21
    FHU, 2 etg.
    5009 Bergen
    Room 
    235
  • Postal Address
    Postboks 7804
    5020 Bergen
Academic article
  • Show author(s) (2015). Three differently generated salmon protein hydrolysates reveal opposite effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in mice fed a high-fat diet. Food Chemistry. 101-110.
  • Show author(s) (2015). Effect of fish and krill oil supplementation on glucose tolerance in rabbits with experimentally induced obesity. European Journal of Nutrition. 1055-1067.
  • Show author(s) (2015). A protein extract from chicken reduces plasma homocysteine in rats. Nutrients. 4498-4511.
  • Show author(s) (2014). Hypolipidemic effect of dietary water-soluble protein extract from chicken: impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid and bile acid metabolism. European Journal of Nutrition. 193-204.
  • Show author(s) (2014). Hypolipidemic effect of dietary water-soluble protein extract from chicken: impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid and bile acid metabolism. European Journal of Nutrition. 193-204.
  • Show author(s) (2014). A salmon protein hydrolysate exerts lipid-independent anti-atherosclerotic activity in apoE-deficient mice. PLOS ONE.
  • Show author(s) (2013). Krill protein hydrolysate reduces plasma triacylglycerol level with concurrent increase in plasma bile acid level and hepatic fatty acid catabolism in high-fat fed mice. The Functional Foods in Health and Disease (FFHD). 428-440.
  • Show author(s) (2013). An immunomodulating fatty acid analogue targeting mitochondria exerts anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond plasma cholesterol-lowering activity in apoE(-/-) mice. PLOS ONE. 14 pages.
  • Show author(s) (2012). Krill powder increases liver lipid catabolism and reduces glucose mobilization in tumor necrosis factor-alpha transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 1461-1472.
Doctoral dissertation
  • Show author(s) (2015). Bioactive proteins and peptides influence lipid metabolism and inflammation in relation to atherosclerosis.

More information in national current research information system (CRIStin)