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News archive for DIGSSCORE

Using a combination of data from the Norwegian Citizen Panel and other sources, researchers at the Institute for Social Research (ISR) have analyzed the development of Norwegian citizens’ levels of trust in politicians since 2000. The key findings of the project, which was ordered by the Ministry of Local Government and Modernization, were presented by ISR’s Jo Saglie and Signe Bock Segaard in... Read more
Using a survey experimental approach, relying on panel data from the Norwegian Citizen Panel, Lars Erik Berntzen's recent article was published as part of the Politics and Governance issue “Populism and Polarization: A Dual Threat to Europe’s Liberal Democracies?”.
This handbook bring together accomplished scholars who study one or more aspect of electoral persuasion. Elisabeth Ivarsflaten and Lise Bjånesøy contribute with the chapter "How and Why the Populist Radical Right Persuades Citizens" written jointly with Scott Blinder.
A recent article in Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, using data from the Citizen Lab, finds that mutual partner choice enables cooperators to outperform free riders.
A new publication by Erik Knudsen and Mikael Poul Johannesson used data collected through the Norwegian Citizen Panel to explore what lies behind our decisions to read and share news stories on social media.
DIGSSCORE's weekly lunch seminars will be held as webinars this fall. You are welcome to attend the first one on Tuesday September 1.
UIB og Digsscore vann konkurransen om å få ta over den nasjonale koordinatorrolla for European Social Survey.
Call is out for DIGSSCORE scholarships for master students at the University of Bergen, for students interested in using data from the DIGSSCORE facilities.
Using data from survey experiments in Norway, Sweden and Britain, this recent article, published in Comparative Political Studies, studies public support for religious schools.
A recent article in Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, using data from the Norwegian Citizen Panel and the Citizen Lab, finds that a substantial minority in seven experiments with 3,500 participants overall, decided to receive less over more money. This result may compromise the interpretation of many experiments.
A recent article in Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, using data from the Norwegian Citizen Panel, suggests that people's decision about whether to vaccinate is influenced by concern for others. Thus, stressing the collective benefits of vaccination could increase the effectiveness of health campaigns.