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News archive for Archaeology

New digital technology makes it possible to recreate the lives led by our ancestors 100,000 years ago.
Archeologist from UiB discovered the earliest known drawing in a cave in South Africa. The abstract drawing displays a red cross-hatched line pattern, created with an ochre crayon 73 000 years ago.
Groundbreaking research puts human evolution in a new perspective as significant archaeological findings reveals sign of modern human behavior 300 000 years ago.
Thanks to EU funding, the Digital Culture, Archaeology, Philosophy and Theory of Science researchs groups will welcome new international researchers to their team. These groups at the Faculty of Humanities received five out of seven Marie Curie grants awarded to UiB.
The new Centre of Excellence at The University of Bergen aims to discover the past to understand the present.
UiB researcher Karen van Niekerk's road to (a Centre of) excellence.
Ramona Harrison was born in Austria, educated in the US and is employed in Norway. But her academic heart belongs to Iceland.
Archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood and cardiologist Kenneth Dickstein have both been named among the most cited researchers in the world.
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age used advanced heating techniques that vastly improved living conditions during the era.
Climate change was less important for technological innovation among Stone Age humans than previously assumed.
Using skeletons, biological anthropologist Stian Suppersberger Hamre studies the food and travels of Scandinavians who lived 1,000 years ago.
Our early ancestors, Homo sapiens, managed to evolve and journey across the earth by exchanging and improving their technology. Research from the University of Bergen shows that cultural interaction has been vital to the rise of humankind.
Despite a strong domination of men, many women worked and lived at Bryggen (“The German Wharf”) in Bergen during the Middle Ages. Sigrid Samset Mygland wanted to find out who these women were.
North Europeans resisted adaption of farming and herding when these practices arrived in Europe about 8,000 years ago, according to a new study conducted by a team including Archaeology Professor Francesco d’Errico at the University of Bergen.
In its January 2015 edition, National Geographic magazine has a 22 page article, Origins of Art, showing the research of UiB archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood.
According to a new study of freshwater shells from the Indonesian island of Java, early hominins created geometric engravings 450,000 years ago.
Professors Randi and Gunnar Håland have added colour and spice to life and research at UiB, and have built relations that have put Bergen on the world map.
Professor Christopher Henshilwood is already a holder of an advanced grant from the European Research Council. Now he has also been named as one of the most cited researchers in the world.

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