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A global alliance of leading climate research universities is urging the G20 countries to embrace a build back better strategy for the post-pandemic recovery. This includes prioritising net zero emissions and planning for a more circular economy.
How can scientific knowledge on the treasures of the ocean contribute to informing policy? This was the key topic at the second Ocean Sustainability Bergen Conference.
Every year, several countries present their Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) to show their progress in implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. But how can science play an integral part in these proceedings?
On UN Day 2018 – 24 October, the University of Bergen was announced as the official UNAI Hub for SDG14 – Life below water. Two years on, we look at what has been achieved during this time.
A new interdisciplinary project to create research leaders for marine sustainability is a prime part of the University of Bergen’s engagement with the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development.
How can the ocean provide knowledge and research for the medicine and food of the future? The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the world community that biodiversity is key to securing solutions for the future and how dependent we are of the secrets of the ocean.
Biodiversity is one of the key issues in the debate for sustaining and developing our common ocean resources. Law researchers at the University of Bergen have long been engaged in judicial questions outside national marine territories.
Ocean science is at the core of the University of Bergen’s science diplomacy activities. By juxtaposing the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda, the university and its partners are quietly providing policymakers with research-based knowledge for global sustainability.
“The ocean has enormous potential. It's not only that we can, but also because we have to produce more from the ocean if we are to avoid climate change,” said Vidar Helgesen aboard tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl on World Ocean Day.
The University of Bergen’s interdisciplinary SDG14 course educates the future ocean science leaders to engage critically with the 2030 Agenda.
Reporting on ocean acidification data directly targeting the Sustainable Development Goals is all in a day’s work for Benjamin Pfeil and his data group at the University of Bergen.
In October 2018 the University of Bergen was given a lead role on SDG14, Life below water, by United Nations Academic Impact. Now the university has been asked to present a four-part series for inspiration on ocean research and education. The UN distributes the series globally.
The University of Bergen is on track with the deliverables promised in SDG Action 28818, which has now been updated to include further deliverables towards the 2030 Agenda.
The new Norway-Pacific Ocean-Climate Scholarship Programme builds on long-term collaboration between two ocean and climate oriented universities, which includes a voluntary commitment at the inaugural UN Ocean Conference.
For the second year running the University of Bergen is ranked in the top 100 THE University Impact Rankings. The rankings are based on how oriented a university is towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and social responsibility.
The research programme GRIP has launched a series of interviews on global inequality as a response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
In a meeting on biological diversity on the high seas, scientists and other actors gave valuable advice to representatives from Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs before final negotiations on regulation of natural resources outside of national jurisdiction.
In a special workshop during the SDG Conference Bergen a group of leading international researchers presented their visions for improving science advice to decision-makers.

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