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Geophysical Institute

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within four resarch groups:

We also host the Energy Lab and do research and development on renewable energy (solar, wind and water).

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

Research prize

Ilker Fer is to receive the Georg Wüst Prize 2017

The German Society for Marine Research (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Meeresforschung, DGM) recently announced the recipient of the Georg Wüst Prize 2017. Congratulations Ilker Fer!

New Research projects

Five new research projects to scientists at Geophysical Institute

In the programme FRINATEK, the research counsil distributed 251 mill. NOK on 32 new research projects. Four of these are for researchers at Geophysical Institute. We also got one of five projects in the programme Polarprog.

Research

In the right place at the right time

Based on a unique dataset collected during a research cruise to the Irminger Sea in April 2015, a new paper, published in Nature Communications, reveals a strong link between atmospheric forcing, deep convection, ocean ventilation and anthropogenic carbon sequestration.

Research

El Niño influences the formation of low pressure systems over the Gulf Stream

Analysis of cyclone tracks and precyclogenesis flow conditions show us that El Niño can shift the preferred cyclogenesis position over the Gulf Stream which influences the cyclone’s track across the North Atlantic. The results are published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.

Researchers to watch

Improving climate prediction

What will the earth’s climate be like in the future? Noel Keenlyside works hard to let us know.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host Norwegian Research School in Climate Dynamics

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.