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Geophysical Institute

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within four resarch groups:

We also host the Energy Lab and do research and development on renewable energy (solar, wind and water).

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

New research

Reduced sea ice cover off Greenland may have surprising effect on ocean currents

With global warming, ocean circulation in the Atlantic Ocean is generally thought to weaken. New research shows that less sea ice off the coast of Greenland may work against this.

New research

The Arctic sea-ice loss and winter temperatures in Eurasia

A long debate of the role of the sea ice and the winter temperatures in Eurasia has got a new contribution. Probably no connection, a new study says.

New research

Pacific influences European weather

Sea surface temperature in the distant tropical Pacific can influence November weather in Europe.

News

Does the world really need more energy? - Professor Finn Gunnar Nielsen (GFI)

Access to clean and affordable energy is essential to eradicate poverty, end hunger and combat climate change, but do we need to change the way we think about energy?

New research

Deciphering ancestry in the cyclones' hencoop

On TV weather maps we see low pressure centers as circles resembling tree-rings, with long tails of red warm fronts and blue cold fronts. But what came first – the low or the fronts?

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.