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Oda Eiken Maraire's picture

Oda Eiken Maraire

PhD Candidate
  • E-mailOda.Maraire@uib.no
  • Phone+47 900 57 585
  • Visitor Address
    Fosswinckelsgt. 6
  • Postal Address
    Postboks 7802
    5020 BERGEN

This PhD-project, Making a home: An ethnographic study examining the production of ‘home’ and urban futures in Johannesburg, South Africa, seeks to explore home-making and urban enclaving in Johannesburg, South Africa. The project will investigate the dialectic relations between people and the material world as a means to understand how processes of enclaving work to transform urban structures and everyday practices, particularly along gendered lines. In order to examine the sociality dimensions of enclaving the study is specifically concerned with the materialities and aesthetics of 'home-making'.

The research will investigate how people live in the city and the visions people have for their own future and the future of the city. Questions I aim to explore include: 1) How do people look at the built environment of the neighbourhood and the city? 2) How do people create their home today and how do they imagine their home in the future? With this focus, the study aims to map out how people conceptualize, are influenced by, and influence processes of enclaving in possibly different ways, and thus trace their imaginaries of urban future(s) and their homes and neighbourhoods, and how these are interlocked with imaginaries and practices of the past and the present.

Journal articles
  • Müftüoglu, Ingrid Birce; Knudsen, Ståle; Dale, Ragnhild Freng; Eiken, Oda; Rajak, Dinah; Lange, Siri. 2018. Rethinking access. Key methodological challenges in studying energy companies. Energy Research & Social Science. 45: 250-257. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2018.07.019

More information in national current research information system (CRIStin)

Müftüoglu, Ingrid Birce, Ståle Knudsen, Ragnhild Freng Dale, Oda Eiken, Dinah Rajak, and Siri Lange. 2018. 'Rethinking access: Key methodological challenges in studying energy companies', Energy research & social science, 45: 250-57.

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