Home
Biorecognition

News archive for Biorecognition

Reviewers of the month, Dec 2022
After years of work, we finally can see what the apicomplexan glideosome-associated connector (GAC) really looks like! Check out our latest preprint presenting the structure in two drastically different conformations. Based on its structure, we suggest a role for GAC as an elastic spring helping parasite motility and invasion.
Ruth Brenk has given a brief update of the riboswitch research in our group at the Digital Breakfast organized by the the Center of Digital Life.
Andrea's work together with collaborators from IMBB-FORTH (Heraklion, Crete) and Francis Crick Institute (London, UK) on malaria parasite actin II is out in preprint form.
We are looking for a post-doctoral fellow for a 2.5-year project (possible extension for up to 1 year) in my group at the Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine (FBMM), University of Oulu, Finland. Alternatively, an exceptionally highly-qualified PhD student could be considered. The overall aim of my group is to understand the molecular mechanism of malaria parasite gliding motility. To... Read more
Henni's recent work on characterizing compounds interfering with the malaria parasite profilin-actin complex and actin dynamics is out as a preprint on bioRxiv. The project is part of a large collaboration led by Madeline Dans and Paul Gilson from the Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
Today, we have a special pleasure to host Dr. Linda Sandblad, the Director of the Umeå Centre for Electron Microscopy, as our BBB seminar speaker. Already visited Ulriken to see Bergen from above and had exciting exchange of ideas on our projects. Now looking forward to Linda's talk at 14:30. Come by if you are nearby! https://www.uib.no/en/biomedisin/156022/bbb-seminar-linda-sandblad
Our manuscript on the smallest malaria parasite myosin, MyoB, was accepted for publication in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Read here a summary of Isa's nice work on this so-far uncharacterized myosin, which is important for the parasite invasion of red blood cells.
On Thursday October 6th, Atta defended his PhD thesis entitled "Structural characterization of Toxoplasma gondii armadillo repeat only protein and purification of actins from apicomplexan parasites". As the opponent, we had the pleasure of hosting Dr. Young-Hwa Song from the University of Lübeck, Germany. Huge congratulations to Atta and many thanks to the opponent and everyone who participated... Read more
We have a new PhD thesis hanging out for public display in the Tree of Science at the FBMM, University of Oulu. On October 6th, Atta will defend his thesis "Structural characterization of Toxoplasma gondii armadillo repeat only protein and purification of actins from apicomplexan parasites". The opponent will be Dr. Young-Hwa Song from the University of Lübeck, Germany. We look forward to the... Read more
Today, Kalyani Mukherjee joined our group as a PhD student, funded by a stipend by the Sigrid Jusélius foundation.
On Wednesday June 1st, Isa defended her PhD at the University of Oulu. The opponent was Professor Alf Månsson from the Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. We all could enjoy an interesting dialogue on myosins and motility, and Isa rocked all the way. Thanks to everyone involved and huge congratulations to Dr. Isa Pires!
Isa's work on Plasmodium falciparum myosin B is out on the preprint server bioRxiv - just in time for her PhD defense. Hopefully soon in peer-reviewed form too.
One week to go to Isa's PhD defense!
This week, Jude Santhampillai joined our group in Oulu as an orientation student and will work for three weeks with Henni.
We have a new PhD thesis hanging out for public display in the Tree of Science at the FBMM, University of Oulu. On June 1st, Isa will defend her thesis "Structural and functional studies on Plasmodium actin-myosin class XIV motors". The opponent will be Professor Alf Månsson from the Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. Looking forward to an interesting examination - stay tuned!
This week, Maiken Fridal Trones is joining us as a MSc student in our lab in Bergen. She will be working on some interesting mutants of Plasmodium actin.
Malaria is one of the most devastating infectious diseases in the world. The parasites causing malaria move by gliding, for which force is generated by an unusual actomyosin motor. We have determined high-resolution cryo-EM structures of the parasite actomyosin and actin filaments and a lower resolution reconstructions of the myosin light chains in the complex.

Pages