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Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion

Gamal tavle med koptisk språk.

Contact:


Telephone: (+47) 55 58 23 00
Fax: (+47) 55 58 96 54
E-mail: post@ahkr.uib.no

Office address: Øysteinsgate 3
Address: Postboks 7805, 5020 BERGEN, Norway

Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour

The Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion – AHKR – was established on 1st August 2007 as a result of restructuring at the Faculty of Humanities, uniting four highly profiled, well established and related disciplines. The Department aims to maintain and strengthen these academic identities, and create a basis for innovative interdisciplinary research and teaching. Seven cross-disciplinary research groups have been established at the department, and a wide range of studies and courses are taught.
 

Disciplines
 

MEET AN EMPLOYEE
Portrett av van der Haven

Ambivalence and Attraction

Alexander van der Haven, Associate Professor in Religious Studies, talks about placing forms of religiosity in a context that makes sense out of them.

Horizon 2020
Portrett av Eivind Seland

International scholars to Bergen to conduct EU-funded research

Six European researchers have received EU funding for research residencies at the University of Bergen through the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) programme. Four of the six grants go to research projects in collaboration with the Faculty of Humanities.

PhD Course, University of Bergen
There is no planet B
Aug 31

Approaches to Climate Change in Environmental Humanities

PhD Course, University of Bergen. 5 ECTS credits. Language: English. The course will be held digitally if the corona situation does not allow physical presence in Bergen.

Meet an employee
Portrett

Global and transnational history - and the story of soybeans

Ines Prodöhl, appointed Associate Professor in history, focuses on economy, agriculture and industry in her research and teaching.

New emloyee
Portrett av Daniela Hofmann

Neolithic studies from Bavaria to Bergen

Daniela Hofmann, newly appointed Associate Professor in archaeology, hopes that the Neolithic social structures can tell us something about the present.