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Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion

News archive for Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion

Archeologist from UiB discovered the earliest known drawing in a cave in South Africa. The abstract drawing displays a red cross-hatched line pattern, created with an ochre crayon 73 000 years ago.
Leszek Gardeła on Viking women with weapons and his lifelong love affair with the North
For many years, the University of Bergen has focused on historical and archaeological research in the Middle East and in Syria in particular. How is the research going forward despite the difficult situation in the region?
Groundbreaking research puts human evolution in a new perspective as significant archaeological findings reveals sign of modern human behavior 300 000 years ago.
Thanks to EU funding, the Digital Culture, Archaeology, Philosophy and Theory of Science researchs groups will welcome new international researchers to their team. These groups at the Faculty of Humanities received five out of seven Marie Curie grants awarded to UiB.
Francesco d’Errico has been named as one of the world’s Highly Cited Researchers according to a new ranking published by prestigious Clarivate Analytics.
UiB's new Centre of Excellence is officially open.
This summer, we take on some of the biggest global challenges, from health and cultural heritage in a digital age, to ecology and ethics, food security, and rights as political tools.
Archaeologist Magnus M. Haaland received the award at peer-reviewed conference in Newcastle.
The new Centre of Excellence at The University of Bergen aims to discover the past to understand the present.
UiB researcher Karen van Niekerk's road to (a Centre of) excellence.
Ramona Harrison was born in Austria, educated in the US and is employed in Norway. But her academic heart belongs to Iceland.
Archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood and cardiologist Kenneth Dickstein have both been named among the most cited researchers in the world.
Archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood and cardiologist Kenneth Dickstein have both been named among the most cited researchers in the world.
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age used advanced heating techniques that vastly improved living conditions during the era.
Andrea Bender combines psychology and anthropology to observe how our language and culture shape the way we perceive the world.
NB! The seminar will be held in the seminarroom at the ground-/first floor, Sydnesplassen 12/13 the hole semester! Open course at the Department of Philosophy, autumn 2016.
Climate change was less important for technological innovation among Stone Age humans than previously assumed.

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