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Variants in different genes may cause developmental delay and various syndromes. Researchers from USA, Saudi Arabia and Norway recently uncovered pathogenic gene variants causing developmental delay and intellectual disabilities in a gene not previously linked to genetic disease.
Around 600 children are born with congenital heart disease in Norway each year. Little is known about the causes of congenital heart defects. A new international study involving researchers from University of Bergen and Haukeland University Hospital shows that the NAA15 protein can play an important role.
Ine and Emilie were attending a project course priming them for lab work. They ended up co-developing a method to quality control a cell model which is used by thousands of researchers worldwide.
Actin is modified by N-terminal acetylation which regulates its role in steering cellular architecture and cell motility. Now the machinery performing this acetylation is uncovered.
Several variants of the NAA10 gene have been found in patients suffering from developmental delay and hemihypertrophy. NAA10 steers the most common protein modification in humans: N-terminal acetylation.
On Thursday 12th of March, the University of Bergen was shut down on short notice. Employees and students left their study and workplaces, worried about the recently declared pandemic situation and how the next weeks and months would be like.
Have you ever considered doing a research stay abroad to broaden your scientific horizon? Postdoctor Sylvia Varland recently returned from a 2-year research stay at University of Toronto. Learn more about her scientific adventure and cultural experiences.
Actin is the most abundant protein in human cells and is involved in numerous functions including steering cellular architecture, cell motility and cell division. Recently, UiB researchers identified NAA80 as a long-sought actin regulator. Now, the structure of NAA80 bound to actin and profilin reveals its mechanism of action.
During his Erasmus internship in the Arnesen lab, Tobias B. Beigl took great interest in his project on the recently identified NAA80 enzyme. Beigl was on an interesting and important research track and stayed on for a Master’s project trying to figure out why cells lacking NAA80 typically had a more fragmented Golgi apparatus. He recently published his findings in the scientific journal... Read more
In human cells, N-terminal acetylation is among the most common protein modifications. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Bergen have revealed the structural and biochemical properties of the major molecular machine involved in this process. Cancer cells require this enzyme for survival and proliferation.
Monica Hellesvik has been one of the pioneers to test the new TIRF microscope at the department. She needed to look closely at cell adhesive properties and the TIRF microscope was the perfect tool for it since it is particularly well suited for studying structures closest to the glass slides.
N-terminal acetylation is a very common protein modification and NAA10 is the major responsible enzyme in human cells. Here we found a novel pathological NAA10 variant, NAA10 p. (R83H), in two boys with developmental delay and intellectual disabilities.
Two PNAS articles from the Arnesen lab are elected as the best publication of the year 2018 at the Faculty of Medicine. The prize will be awarded at the Faculty Day on 13 June 2019.
As the first lab in Norway, the NAT lab recently installed a HoloMonitor system for 3D live cell microscopy. This novel instrument allows us to spy on the cells in a gentle and non-invasive way.
Arnesen Lab reveals that the global level of N-terminal acetylation, a highly abundant protein modification in eukaryotes, remains stable in starving yeast cells despite an overall decrease in the cellular level of acetyl-CoA. The findings, described in the December issue of Molecular & Cellular Proteomics¸ represent the first comprehensive study of metabolic regulation of N-terminal... Read more
Cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of factors gone wrong in the cell. NAA10 may be one such factor. This is a protein that performs many different tasks, including the most common which is catalyzing the acetylation of cellular proteins. NAA10 can therefore be viewed as a ”Jack of all trades”-protein. For two decades it has been linked to cancer progression, but recent data puts... Read more
Adrian Drazic, post doctor at the Department of Biomedicine, is one of the recipients of this years award for outstanding young researchers by the Meltzer Foundation.
Monica Hellesviks winning poster “NAA80 knockout cells: Fast and Furious?” scores with elegant simplicity and effective communication of scientific results.

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