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News archive for Centre for Deep Sea Research

Watch the recording of our live-streamed remotely-operated dive at Loki's castle hydrothermal vent field in the Arctic, 2300 meters below sea level.
Join us for a live stream of a remotely-operated dive at Loki's castle hydrothermal vent field in the Arctic, 2300 meters below sea level.
Members of the Center for Deep Sea Research have received funding from Akademia Avtalen to organize a field-based course on the Island of Milos (Greece). Here is the description and the application link.
Last week, four members of the Centre for Deep Sea Research led a field excursion for the GEOV-109 Introduction to Geochemistry course at a former pyrite mine in Sunnhordland Geopark.
A lot is happening next week in Bergen, with among other the One Ocean week and the Ocean outlook events. Several members of the Centre for Deep Sea Research are involved in various events.
The Geomicrobiology Laboratory at UiB becomes the first public laboratory in Norway to receive the environmental certification from My Green Lab. The work on the certification has been done with support from the UiB Climate Fund.
Are inactive hydrothermal area really inactive? Maybe not... At least not microbiologically.
A new microbiology study points to highly active microorganisms living on ‘dead’ chimneys long after fluid flow has ceased to supply them with traditional chemical fuels. The findings have important implications for understanding inactive hydrothermal vents of commercial interest for deep-sea mining.
What did the surface of Earth look like more than three billion years ago? What kinds of microbes lived there and when did they start producing oxygen? And what was the temperature and composition of the ancient oceans and atmosphere? Big questions like these is what drew a group of 41 scientists to sunny Berlin last week, including our Associate professor Desiree Roerdink.
Underneath the ocean floor, thrives a vast biosphere which activity profoundly impacting our global environment; from the air that we breathe, to the balance of the global carbon budget. The functioning of this biosphere is what the new director at the Centre for Deep Sea Research at UiB, Steffen Leth Jørgensen, seeks to understand.
Scientists taking part in the 2023 GoNorth expedition have discovered a new hydrothermal field – an area with sea floor hot springs – in the Lena Trough, part of a mid-ocean ridge between Svalbard and Greenland.
Early August, the GONORTH cruise organised by several Norwegian institutions came to an end. On its last ROV dive, a new hydrothermal vent field, named Ultima Thule, was discovered on the Lucky Ridge!
Håvard Stubseid and his colleagues just published a new article in Nature communication.
The ongoing GONORTH cruise is pushing the limits of deep sea exploration in the north.
The Center for Deep sea will host a workshop on compositional data analysis with Vera Pawlowsky-Glahn and Juan José Egozcue from the 14th to the 18th of August.
Some news from the sea!
Members of the Center for Deep Sea Research and the University of Athens have received funding from Akademia Avtalen to organize a field-based course on the Island of Milos (Greece). Here is the description and the application link.

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