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Bergen Summer Research School

News archive for Bergen Summer Research School

The launch at the University Aula concluded with two large panels representing the diversity of scientific milieus tackling global challenges in Bergen. Together they will work to make Bergen the place of choice for students seeking knowledge and skills to help solve global challenges.
We now welcome applications for six parallel courses with cross-cutting keynotes and virtual social events. BSRS 2021 will be a fully digital PhD research school.
The COVID-19 outbreak of 2020 forced Bergen Research Summer School (BSRS) to transform from a physical to a virtual gathering of international students.
Bergen Summer Research School opened 8 June with a record number of participants. Together with some of Bergen's best research milieus, they will explore how their research can contribute to solving global challenges. This year they meet online - watch the many public lectures on YouTube.
Last summer, the participants of Bergen Summer Research School were thrown out on the deep end: present your research in two minutes and make it relevant to a panel of diplomats and experts.
According to Håvard Haarstad, scientists have to commit to doing everything they can to get society moving in the right direction. His own commitment to saving the world earned him a night in prison in New York.
"Climate accounting shows that cuts in CO2 will be necessary until the year 2030. The objective of climate neutrality must be reached, but we need help from students and staff, says Deputy University Director Tore Tungodden. 
Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, BSRS 2020 was organised as a virtual research school. 
For the eleventh consecutive year, almost one hundred PhD candidates from all over the world have found their way to Bergen to tackle global challenges.
For a decade, the Bergen Summer Research School (BSRS) has engaged PhD candidates from all over the world in discussions about the global challenges facing the world.
Imagine that you were to meet Bill Gates in a lift. You strike up a conversation and he asks you what you do. As it happens, you have just come up with an idea that you believe could change the world. In the approximately two minutes until the elevator reaches your floor, you decide to try to convince him that he should invest in your idea. What would you say?
Professor Terje Tvedt criticizes Social Sciences for being “water blind”.
The ninth Bergen Summer Research School 2016 kicks off Monday June 13 at Dragefjellet. World leading researchers and over one hundred PhD candidates from 40 countries will spend two weeks immersed in global challenges – this year related to water.
Why did the industrial revolution first emerge in Europe and not in Asia? Professor Terje Tvedt wants to answer this question, and is now in the final round for an ERC Advanced Grant.
A human rights based approach may make governments legally accountable for the political commitments made in the Sustainable Development Goals.

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