Home

Egalitarian Futures Research Group

Main content

Float in Singapore

The Egalitarian Futures Research Group (FUTURES) is globally comparative and located in the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen (UiB). Our point of departure is the idea that the future - the orientation towards a time yet to come - is fundamental for understanding contemporary global society.

Our group of researchers empirically map and investigate various groups of people who are particularly and intensively preoccupied with futures.

Publications
Book collage

Publications from FUTURES

During the recent years, the researchers of FUTURES and the previous “Egalitarianism: Forms, Processes, Comparisons” project have produced an impressive number of important publications.

The UiB Magazine interview
Professor Bruce Kapferer

Bruce Kapferer: Exploring the true nature of inequality

With the pioneering Egalitarianism project, Professor Bruce Kapferer wanted to challenge conventions in anthropology and to redefine how inequality is viewed.

New publication
After the Pink Tide Cover

New Publication: “After the Pink Tide: Corporate State Formation and New Egalitarianisms in Latin America”

This recent publication by editors Marina Gold and Alessandro Zagato, affiliated researchers of the Egalitarian Futures Research Group (EFRG), investigates the state of egalitarianism and the corporate state formation in Latin America after the Pink Tide movement.

ERC ADVANCED GRANT
ECONOMY UNBALANCED: Activist groups, such as the Occupy movement, are vocal in their protest against inequality and the increasing gap between rich and poor in many Western economies.

Equality in crisis

How does greater inequality create dividing lines in society? That is one of the central issues in Professor Bruce Kapferer’s new research project.

RESEARCH | ANTHROPOLOGY
Professor Annelin Eriksen, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen (UiB), photographed in July 2018.

The drama of cultural change

What happens when the basic values and social mechanism of society are challenged? And how does change influence how we view ourselves as human beings? This is at the heart of a new anthropological project at the University of Bergen.