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Department of Geography
Remote sensing

COVID19 can’t stop remote sensing

Over the last month, 16 students have participated in GEO316 Practical Skills in Remote Sensing.

Screenshot of online teaching
Owing to COVED19 this year the course was taught online. Nils Erik Jørgensen is demonstrating how to map vegetation in the city mountains.
Photo:
Ben Robson

Owing to COVED19 this year the course was taught online using a combination of Microsoft Teams, Zooms, and a virtual machine running on the University of Bergen server. Students have been learning a broad selection of remote sensing methodologies such as creating 3D models from old aerial photographs and then calculating volume changes of a glacier, detecting deforestation in the Amazon, or measuring the speed that a rock glacier is flowing.

Online teaching presented however an opportunity to broaden the teaching on this year’s course. Joining Benjamin Robson in lecturing and presenting computer practicals were PCI Geomatics in Canada who showcased how to process time series of remote sensing data as well as how to process drone data within their software, while Anna Telegina (Scanex, Moscow) held a talk on how Radar remote sensing data is used to help ships navigate the north-east passage during the Arctic winter. Additionally, Nils Erik Jørgensen (TerraNOR) held a short practical on how to identify different vegetation types using satellite imagery and LiDAR data, while Sonam Wangchuk (University of St. Andrews) held a practical on monitoring glacial lakes in his homeland of Bhutan.

The students have using remote sensing in their individual assignments on topics including measuring the extent of forest fires in Australia, mapping forest cover on old aerial photographs using deep learning and looking at the volume of the Rissa landslide. You can view the student posters here.

Some examples from the posters

Márk Aguera assessed flood risk in the Colombian Amazon

Márk Aguera assessed flood risk in the Colombian Amazon.

Photo:
Márk Aguera

Ronja Karin Nanna Lundberg investigated glacier change in the Chilean Andes

Ronja Karin Nanna Lundberg investigated glacier change in the Chilean Andes.

Photo:
Ronja Karin Nanna Lundberg

Julie Elkjær Stentsøe mapped the extent of wildfires in Australia

Julie Elkjær Stentsøe mapped the extent of wildfires in Australia.

Photo:
Julie Elkjær Stentsøe

Johannes Hardeng used archived aerial photography to look at the volume of the Rissa landslide

Johannes Hardeng used archived aerial photography to look at the volume of the Rissa landslide.

Photo:
Johannes Hardeng

Halvor Norendal Hansen used historical aerial photography to study volume changes at Nigardsbreen

Halvor Norendal Hansen used historical aerial photography to study volume changes at Nigardsbreen.

Photo:
Halvor Norendal Hansen

Carl William Lund used deep learning to map forests on historical imagery and assess changes

Carl William Lund used deep learning to map forests on historical imagery and assess changes.

Photo:
Carl William Lund

Carl William Lund used deep learning to map forests on historical imagery and assess changes

Daniel Thomas performed glacier mapping in the vicinity of Mount Everest.

Photo:
Daniel Thomas

Tommy Stamnesfet Loddengaard studied landcover change over 30 years for Askøy

Tommy Stamnesfet Loddengaard studied landcover change over 30 years for Askøy.

Photo:
Tommy Stamnesfet Loddengaard