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Physical Oceanography

News archive for Physical Oceanography

The yearly lecture at the Norwegian Academy of Letters and Sciences.
What are our safe operating spaces for the ocean? This is the starting question for the new EU Horizon 2020 project COMFORT.
The location of the jet stream influences European weather at all times. A new study links its position both to local weather systems and to the far-away Pacific Ocean. Lead author Erica Madonna explains.
How can the academic community make an impact to get vital information on climate change across to decision-makers? By engaging in the type of quiet science advice provided by Benjamin Pfeil and his team at the University of Bergen.
Earlier this August Statsraad Lehmkuhl sailed to Arendal, combining the voyage with a climate and renewable energy conference in collaboration with the Bjerknes Centre
Climate simulation models include more and more processes – not only physical, but also biogeochemical cycles. Can single individuals keep an overview of the major factors governing climate change? Christoph Heinze has led a study that can help you. He presents the new article here.
Allocations from the Academy Agreement between UiB and Equinor were announced on 28.06.2019. Four research projects on offshore wind received funding. In addition BOW was allocated funding for two Associate Professor II positions.
The Gulfstream makes northern Europe warmer by transporting heat. This is well known. New research shows that the sea surface temperature also affects storm tracks as far away as the Pacific.
A newly published study in Nature Communications shows an important new understanding of the climate system that will allow us to better understand past climate variability. The results were uncovered by expeditions between the North Pole and Antarctica.
Did you know that the El Niño Southern Oscillation is a phenomenon involving two-way interactions among the tropical basins? Noel Keenlyside writes about a recent study he has contributed to.
The living conditions for marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may dramatically worsen by the end of the century. More acidic water can make their territories shallower.
Since 1971 Svalbard has experienced a winter warming of 7°C. This has caused major changes, and there is an urgent need to plan for the future, states the new “Climate in Svalbard 2100” report.
Carbon composition is a combined signal of ocean circulation and local biological and chemical processes, a new study shows, drawing special attention to the Southern Ocean.
What caused abrupt climate swings known as the Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last ice age?
Climate-Ocean research and tipping points are common denominators in three new EU funded research projects at the Bjerknes Centre. Christoph Heinze, Noel Keenlyside and Svein Østerhus together with Petra Langebroek received a nice pre-Christmas present, as EU gave their thumbs up for the three new projects. 
Climate researcher Tore Furevik suggests that Norway should think big. Offshore wind can turn the country into a zero-emission society, as well as creating a major boost for the economy.
Algae do not live long, and the nutrient content of the water can change quickly. If you want to predict the primary production in the Barents Sea one or ten years ahead, it is more important to know the current conditions of temperature ocean currents, than the nutrient content in the ocean here and now.
The University of Bergen has taken on a leadership role on SDG 14, Life below water, for United Nations Academic Impact, and will act to inspire and motivate partners worldwide to create greater knowledge towards a sustainable ocean.

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