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Quaternary geology and Paleoclimate

News archive for Quaternary geology and Paleoclimate

When the last ice age was over, a large glacier covering the 1000 meter deep Hardangerfjord collapsed. These events at the end of the ice age in Norway, resemble what we are about to witness in today’s Greenland.
Temperature in the Southern Ocean was more tightly linked to the extent of Antarctic glaciation during past greenhouse climates than previously thought.
Near the end of the last ice age, the global sea level rose 12–14 meters in less than 350 years. Most of the meltwater has been thought to have come from North America and Antarctica. A new study shows that the ice over coastal Norway and the Barents Sea may have contributed almost as much.
During the coldest years of the last ice-age the ice cap reached the British Isles and Polen. New research has revealed that an ice-free green spot existed further north - on a penisula close to Spitsbergen.
Lauritzen is recognized for seminal and ongoing contributions to the field of speleothem science
For two intense weeks,students and lecturers from around the world gathered in the small town of Yosemite National Park to discuss climate science as part of the ACDC summer school
The Advanced Climate Dynamic Courses is celebrating their 10th year anniversary this March by having an alumni conference held in Rondane, Norway.
Forskerne fant nøkkelen til å forklare hvorfor istidene ble lengre og mer intens i midt pleistosen ved å analysere 169 meter med marin leire fra Sørishavet. I en artikkel for det internasjonalt anerkjente tidsskriftet Science, bidrar (Helga) Kikki Flesche Kleiven fra Institutt for geovitenskap og Bjerknessenteret sammen med kollegaer fra Sveits, Tyskland, USA og England til å forklare hvorfor... Read more
Over the course of three days (9-11 May), seven BCCR and Ice2Ice researchers participated in a glacier safety course on the Folgefonna glacier.
On Saturday, March 17, Stein-Erik Lauritzen and Nele Meckler will be leaving for fieldwork in Borneo, Malaysia
“We have been trying to do this trip for five years and we have had a lot of issues with ice,” says expedition leader Jostein Bakke, head of the Quaternary Earth Systems group at Department of Earth Science
“We have been trying to do this trip for five years and we have had a lot of issues with ice,” says expedition leader Jostein Bakke, head of the Quaternary Earth Systems group at department of Earth Science
The Department of Earth Sciences (GEO) is part of HordaFlom, an innovative project which will analyze lake sediments to reconstruct flooding events during the last 2000 years and which will provide more robust projections of future floods
Researcher Nele Meckler wants to understand climate changes by studying fossil shells.
In the last few winters, the airport in Longyearbyen in Svalbard was often closed because of rain. One of the major issues climate researchers deal with is how precipitation changes as the temperatures are rising all over the Arctic.
Geologist Nele Meckler works on reconstruction of past climate conditions. She has now received a Starting Grant from the European Research Council to build her own research group at the University of Bergen.

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