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Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion

News archive for Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion

UiB researcher Karen van Niekerk's road to (a Centre of) excellence.
Ramona Harrison was born in Austria, educated in the US and is employed in Norway. But her academic heart belongs to Iceland.
Archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood and cardiologist Kenneth Dickstein have both been named among the most cited researchers in the world.
Archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood and cardiologist Kenneth Dickstein have both been named among the most cited researchers in the world.
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age used advanced heating techniques that vastly improved living conditions during the era.
Andrea Bender combines psychology and anthropology to observe how our language and culture shape the way we perceive the world.
NB! The seminar will be held in the seminarroom at the ground-/first floor, Sydnesplassen 12/13 the hole semester! Open course at the Department of Philosophy, autumn 2016.
Climate change was less important for technological innovation among Stone Age humans than previously assumed.
Former ERC Advanced Grant holder Christopher Henshilwood leads an exciting new project with roots in archaeology, but drawing on various disciplines. The project is in the final round of qualifying for Centre of Excellence status in Norway.
Using skeletons, biological anthropologist Stian Suppersberger Hamre studies the food and travels of Scandinavians who lived 1,000 years ago.
Four research centres at the University of Bergen have gone to the second round in the process of becoming a Norwegian Centre of Excellence.
Our early ancestors, Homo sapiens, managed to evolve and journey across the earth by exchanging and improving their technology. Research from the University of Bergen shows that cultural interaction has been vital to the rise of humankind.
Despite a strong domination of men, many women worked and lived at Bryggen (“The German Wharf”) in Bergen during the Middle Ages. Sigrid Samset Mygland wanted to find out who these women were.
North Europeans resisted adaption of farming and herding when these practices arrived in Europe about 8,000 years ago, according to a new study conducted by a team including Archaeology Professor Francesco d’Errico at the University of Bergen.
Professor Emeritus Sverre Håkon Bagge has been awarded the Gad Rausing Award for his research on Europe’s medieval history. He receives one million Swedish kroner as part of the award.
UiB Global offers four prospective post-doctoral researchers to develop research applications. APPLY BY MARCH 20, 2015.
In its January 2015 edition, National Geographic magazine has a 22 page article, Origins of Art, showing the research of UiB archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood.

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