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Translational Cell Signaling and Metabolism

Flluorescerende celler

The group focuses on basic principles of cell biology that are important for human diseases. We study cell signalling, protein modifications, and organelle function, and investigate how these affect the cell's metabolism and survival. We also study how these processes affect human diseases and how our knowledge can be used in the clinic.

The group is run by six principal investigators. Please visit our lab pages to learn more about our research.

News | Research
Marc Niere og Mathias Ziegler

Discovered a shuttle that brings the "batteries" into the cell's power houses

Researchers at the University of Bergen have made a major contribution to the discovery of a protein that plays a fundamental role in human energy metabolism.

New research
Structure of actin, profilin and NAA80

Mechanism of a cell motility regulator

Actin is the most abundant protein in human cells and is involved in numerous functions including steering cellular architecture, cell motility and cell division. Recently, UiB researchers identified NAA80 as a long-sought actin regulator. Now, the structure of NAA80 bound to actin and profilin...

New research
The NAA10 Asn101Lys variant disrupts the NAA10-NAA15 (NatA) complex and thereby the ability of this complex to carry out protein N-terminal acetylation.

Novel gene variants linked to developmental delay and hemihypertrophy

Several variants of the NAA10 gene have been found in patients suffering from developmental delay and hemihypertrophy. NAA10 steers the most common protein modification in humans: N-terminal acetylation.

Cell biology
Cryo-EM structures of the NatE complex with/without HYPK bound

The structure of an enzyme complex upregulated in cancer

In human cells, N-terminal acetylation is among the most common protein modifications. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Bergen have revealed the structural and biochemical properties of the major molecular machine involved in this process. Cancer cells require...

International research collaboration
Crystal structure of an enzyme. Background animal and plant shapes

Why evolution invented a paradoxical enzyme that eats up vitamin B3

Mathematical modeling and systems biology explain the evolutionary transition from a four-step to a two-step pathway for the synthesis of NAD from vitamin B3.

Recent news