Home

Translational Cell Signaling and Metabolism

Flluorescerende celler

The group focuses on basic principles of cell biology that are important for human diseases. We study cell signalling, protein modifications, and organelle function, and investigate how these affect the cell's metabolism and survival. We also study how these processes affect human diseases and how our knowledge can be used in the clinic.

The group is run by six principal investigators. Please visit our lab pages to learn more about our research.

Cell biology
Cryo-EM structures of the NatE complex with/without HYPK bound

The structure of an enzyme complex upregulated in cancer

In human cells, N-terminal acetylation is among the most common protein modifications. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Bergen have revealed the structural and biochemical properties of the major molecular machine involved in this process. Cancer cells require...

International research collaboration
Crystal structure of an enzyme. Background animal and plant shapes

Why evolution invented a paradoxical enzyme that eats up vitamin B3

Mathematical modeling and systems biology explain the evolutionary transition from a four-step to a two-step pathway for the synthesis of NAD from vitamin B3.

New Research
NAA80 acetylates actin and is essential for normal Golgi structure

From ERASMUS internship to published paper

During his Erasmus internship in the Arnesen lab, Tobias B. Beigl took great interest in his project on the recently identified NAA80 enzyme. Beigl was on an interesting and important research track and stayed on for a Master’s project trying to figure out why cells lacking NAA80 typically had a...

Award
To forskningsartikkler stemplet med Best paper 2018

Paper of the year 2018

Two PNAS articles from the Arnesen lab are elected as the best publication of the year 2018 at the Faculty of Medicine. The prize will be awarded at the Faculty Day on 13 June 2019.

Master’s degree
The image shows a stained cell with adhesion patches in red and actin cytoskeleton in yellow/white

TIRFing the Master’s degree to shore

Monica Hellesvik has been one of the pioneers to test the new TIRF microscope at the department. She needed to look closely at cell adhesive properties and the TIRF microscope was the perfect tool for it since it is particularly well suited for studying structures closest to the glass slides.