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The new Norway-Pacific Ocean-Climate Scholarship Programme builds on long-term collaboration between two ocean and climate oriented universities, which includes a voluntary commitment at the inaugural UN Ocean Conference.
Near the end of the last ice age, the global sea level rose 12–14 meters in less than 350 years. Most of the meltwater has been thought to have come from North America and Antarctica. A new study shows that the ice over coastal Norway and the Barents Sea may have contributed almost as much.
In a meeting on biological diversity on the high seas, scientists and other actors gave valuable advice to representatives from Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs before final negotiations on regulation of natural resources outside of national jurisdiction.
The SDG Bergen Policy Briefs series was presented to researchers gathered for a workshop on science diplomacy at the 2020 SDG Conference Bergen.
The world’s sea level was at one time ten meters higher than today. Researchers have now discovered where the water came from. 
According to Håvard Haarstad, scientists have to commit to doing everything they can to get society moving in the right direction. His own commitment to saving the world earned him a night in prison in New York.
In partnership with Palau's UN Mission and IOC-UNESCO, the University of Bergen arranged a side event at Our Ocean to discuss the science necessary to secure marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction as part of international law.
190 scientists, students and ocean enthusiasts gathered in the University Aula for the inaugural Ocean Sustainability Bergen Conference and speeches on current research and inspirational speeches on a sustainable ocean.
“A new deal for nature is on everyone's lips,” said Ambassador Peter Thomson in his public lecture after becoming an honorary doctor at the University of Bergen.
Climate scientist Elisabeth Holland has become the Norway-Pacific Joint Chair of Oceans and Climate Change. The position builds on a voluntary commitment at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference. #OceanAction18613
How can the academic community make an impact to get vital information on climate change across to decision-makers? By engaging in the type of quiet science advice provided by Benjamin Pfeil and his team at the University of Bergen.
Can technology solve Earth's need for transformation? This was the major question at the SDG Bergen panel debate during the Arendalsuka 2019 festival.
The University of Bergen visited the High-level Political Forum to strengthen the science policy advice in the approaches to and implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We recount the proceedings from two hectic weeks in seven brief chapters.
The challenges for the science-policy nexus to succeed were discussed at a side event hosted at Norway's Mission to the UN. The conclusion was that science may not be questioned, but is in danger of being ignored.
“It was good to see all UN member states discuss climate at the High-level Political Forum, understanding the need for less talk and more action. Solving the climate issue is key to all the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).”
Educating the climate researchers and leaders of the future and at the same time showing the scope and diversity in climate research in Bergen, is one of the aims when University of Bergen researchers are involved in several sessions at the UN in July 2019.
The University of Bergen's pioneering approach to the SDGs has brought the university in direct contact with the United Nations to provide scientific advice.
The SDG Bergen initiative is presented in a special 10-page section in the UiB Magazine.

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