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Climate and energy transition

News archive for Climate and energy transition

NorRen Summer School invites participants from a wide spectre of disciplines, this year focussing on flexible energy systems.
Historically speaking, energy usage and economic prosperity have been closely linked. The world must become more energy efficient and in a few decades, we will have to switch from fossil fuel to renewable energy in order to reach our climate goals.
Our research communities play a vital role in generating knowledge to be used in assessing the overall effects and consequences of actions and behaviors, and to identify and suggest knowledge-based solutions for sustainable climate, business, and societal development.
The objective of the Ph.d-projects is to help solve societal challenges related to climate and energy transition and to increase and strengthen research activities within the field.
“The ocean has enormous potential. It's not only that we can, but also because we have to produce more from the ocean if we are to avoid climate change,” said Vidar Helgesen aboard tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl on World Ocean Day.
The University of Bergen’s interdisciplinary SDG14 course educates the future ocean science leaders to engage critically with the 2030 Agenda.
Reporting on ocean acidification data directly targeting the Sustainable Development Goals is all in a day’s work for Benjamin Pfeil and his data group at the University of Bergen.
In October 2018 the University of Bergen was given a lead role on SDG14, Life below water, by United Nations Academic Impact. Now the university has been asked to present a four-part series for inspiration on ocean research and education. The UN distributes the series globally.
The new Norway-Pacific Ocean-Climate Scholarship Programme builds on long-term collaboration between two ocean and climate oriented universities, which includes a voluntary commitment at the inaugural UN Ocean Conference.
Near the end of the last ice age, the global sea level rose 12–14 meters in less than 350 years. Most of the meltwater has been thought to have come from North America and Antarctica. A new study shows that the ice over coastal Norway and the Barents Sea may have contributed almost as much.
In a meeting on biological diversity on the high seas, scientists and other actors gave valuable advice to representatives from Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs before final negotiations on regulation of natural resources outside of national jurisdiction.
The SDG Bergen Policy Briefs series was presented to researchers gathered for a workshop on science diplomacy at the 2020 SDG Conference Bergen.
The world’s sea level was at one time ten meters higher than today. Researchers have now discovered where the water came from. 
According to Håvard Haarstad, scientists have to commit to doing everything they can to get society moving in the right direction. His own commitment to saving the world earned him a night in prison in New York.
In partnership with Palau's UN Mission and IOC-UNESCO, the University of Bergen arranged a side event at Our Ocean to discuss the science necessary to secure marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction as part of international law.
190 scientists, students and ocean enthusiasts gathered in the University Aula for the inaugural Ocean Sustainability Bergen Conference and speeches on current research and inspirational speeches on a sustainable ocean.
“A new deal for nature is on everyone's lips,” said Ambassador Peter Thomson in his public lecture after becoming an honorary doctor at the University of Bergen.
Climate scientist Elisabeth Holland has become the Norway-Pacific Joint Chair of Oceans and Climate Change. The position builds on a voluntary commitment at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference. #OceanAction18613

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