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Michael Sars Centre

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Underwater images of marine life

The Michael Sars Centre at the University of Bergen, is an international community of scientists using advanced technologies to study the unique molecular and cellular biology of marine organisms in a changing environment for broad societal impact.

As one of the first EMBL partners, the Michael Sars Centre is rooted in the Bergen academic community and serves as a national strategical asset for Norwegian marine life sciences. We aim to establish, strengthen, and leverage local, national, and international networks through specific activities, including collaborative research, joint training, and scientific exchange.

 

Publications
Protein figure

Uncovering the intricate interactions of neuropeptides with their receptors

Neuropeptides and their receptors are ubiquitous in animals, but the way they interact with each other is poorly known. In a new article, researchers described the dynamic structure of a FMRFamide receptor and novel tools to predict the function of these proteins in animals.

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SYMPOSIUM

Nordic Developmental Biology Societies & Michael Sars Symposium Joint Meeting

We cordially invite you to join us in Bergen, Norway from Tuesday 28th until Friday 31st May 2024!

Publications
Scientific image

Decoding Sensory Navigation: Insights into Larval Settlement Mechanisms in Marine Invertebrates

A new paper from the Chatzigeorgiou Group unravels the enigmatic sensory strategies of planktonic larvae using Ciona intestinalis as a model organism.

News
Ronja Göhde PhD Defense

Congratulations Dr. Göhde!

On the 15th of December 2023, PhD candidate Ronja Göhde successfully defended her thesis titled: “Secretory vesicle protein homologues in choanoflagellates”.

Publications
GABA activate delta-type glutamate receptor in starfish

The surprising activity of GABA at excitatory invertebrate neurotransmitter receptors

A recent study provides insights into how iGluRs function and reveals an unexpected role of GABA in excitatory signaling in invertebrates.