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Underwater images of marine life

The Michael Sars Centre at the University of Bergen, is an international community of scientists using advanced technologies to study the unique molecular and cellular biology of marine organisms in a changing environment for broad societal impact.

As one of the first EMBL partners, the Michael Sars Centre is rooted in the Bergen academic community and serves as a national strategical asset for Norwegian marine life sciences. We aim to establish, strengthen, and leverage local, national, and international networks through specific activities, including collaborative research, joint training, and scientific exchange.

 

News
Nordic Developmental Biology Societies & Michael Sars Symposium Joint Meeting

Bringing together the Nordic Developmental Biology communities in Bergen

Offering a unique perspective on the latest advances in Developmental Biology, the Nordic Developmental Biology Societies & Michael Sars Symposium Joint Meeting attracted a diverse audience and strengthened connections between Nordic and international institutions.

News
Yuhong Wang defense

Congratulations Dr. Wang!

On the 21st of May 2024, PhD candidate Yuhong Wang successfully defended her thesis titled: “Nature's View of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors”

News
Science pic

Revealing the mechanisms of genome activation in Ciona germline

A new article from the Christiaen group offers crucial insights into the onset of zygotic gene expression in the germline of Ciona, uncovering a two-step model for genome activation.

News
Aquarium opening

Michael Sars Centre jellyfish unveiled at the Bergen Aquarium

Bergen Aquarium hosted an inaugural event for their latest exhibit, "Havet i endring" or "The Changing Ocean." The new installation features a 1200L aquarium showcasing jellyfish generously gifted by the Centre.

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Scientific image

Cross-phyla insights into iGluR function: From rat NMDA receptors to placozoan leak channels

Researchers from the Lynagh Group reveal how minor amino acid variations in ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) can lead to major functional changes across animal phyla.