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News archive for Michael Sars Centre

In a recent article, researchers from the Steinmetz group characterized the astonishing ability of sea anemones to adapt to food availability by growing and shrinking their body throughout their lives.
On the 14th of June 2024, PhD candidate Giulio Rosano successfully defended his thesis titled: “Evolution of the delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors”
Offering a unique perspective on the latest advances in Developmental Biology, the Nordic Developmental Biology Societies & Michael Sars Symposium Joint Meeting attracted a diverse audience and strengthened connections between Nordic and international institutions.
On the 21st of May 2024, PhD candidate Yuhong Wang successfully defended her thesis titled: “Nature's View of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors”
A new article from the Christiaen group offers crucial insights into the onset of zygotic gene expression in the germline of Ciona, uncovering a two-step model for genome activation.
Bergen Aquarium hosted an inaugural event for their latest exhibit, "Havet i endring" or "The Changing Ocean." The new installation features a 1200L aquarium showcasing jellyfish generously gifted by the Centre.
Amidst the festivities of One Ocean Week, researchers from the Michael Sars Centre embraced the opportunity to engage with the public on Family Day and participate in the Ocean Outlook conference.
Researchers from the Lynagh Group reveal how minor amino acid variations in ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) can lead to major functional changes across animal phyla.
A new video abstract for Current Biology explores how specific chemical cues control the settlement and metamorphosis of Ciona larvae. Watch the film to hear researchers from the Chatzigeorgiou Group discuss their findings.
Professor Giovanni Zambon and researcher Dr. Valentina Zaffaroni Caorsi from the University of Milan-Bicocca recently visited the Centre to conduct preliminary experiments as part of the pan-European project DeuteroNoise.
After six months at the Centre, research interns Catharina Kolner and Célestine Allombert-Blaise are off to the next steps of their path as young scientists. With their dedication and enthusiasm, they have made invaluable contributions to their respective research projects.
Researchers from the Michael Sars Centre engaged visitors with interactive exhibits and offered insights into marine life fostering scientific curiosity and education among guests of all ages.
Neuropeptides and their receptors are ubiquitous in animals, but the way they interact with each other is poorly known. In a new article, researchers described the dynamic structure of a FMRFamide receptor and novel tools to predict the function of these proteins in animals.
A new paper from the Chatzigeorgiou Group unravels the enigmatic sensory strategies of planktonic larvae using Ciona intestinalis as a model organism.
A recent study provides insights into how iGluRs function and reveals an unexpected role of GABA in excitatory signaling in invertebrates.
Parasitic flatworms undergo drastic changes throughout their life cycle, including a rewiring of their nervous systems. A new paper explores the molecular mechanisms underlying this remarkable feature.
On the 15th of December 2023, PhD candidate Ronja Göhde successfully defended her thesis titled: “Secretory vesicle protein homologues in choanoflagellates”.
The Appendicularian Facility at the Michael Sars Centre at the University of Bergen is one of only four in the world. This month, guest researchers traveled from the U.S. to conduct experiments in this unique laboratory.

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