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Graduate School of Human Interaction and Growth

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Contact

Research school leader: Jørn Hetland

Telephone: 55 58 29 60

Årstadveien 17, 5009 BERGEN

ghig@uib.no

The Graduate School of Human Interaction and Growth (GHIG) was established in March 2006 at Faculty of Psychology at the University of Bergen. GHIG collaborates closely with the Department of Health Promotion and Development and the Department of Psychosocial Sciences. The graduate school focuses on social and psychological change processes within fields such as organisation and leadership, school development and learning, and health promotion and preventive initiatives.

The PhD-projects connected with GHIG are based on a broad theoretical foundation, but with a clear emphasis on theories of change within a social scientific relational perspective. Important topics and analytical concepts are related to social processes and relations such as social conflicts, discourses, social differences, social trends, social cognitive processes, democracy, marginalisation and gender and development.

NEWS
Arnold Bakker

New Adjunct Professor at GHIG

Arnold Bakker is an internationally known organizational psychologist who lectures frequently to professional groups, business audiences, and students. He has been on Thomson Reuters’ list of “Most influential scientific minds” since 2013.

Understanding and addressing inequality

Welcome to The annual Bergen Summer Research School (BSRS)

Scientific Director for BSRS 2022 is Professor Haldis Haukanes, Department of Health Promotion and Development, UiB.

BERGEN SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOOL
Bergen houses

Understanding and addressing inequality

Digital summer research school for PhD students with six parallel courses on large global challenges. Apply by 15 February 2022 (extended deadline).

News
book cover

The open-access Handbook of Salutogenesis, 2nd Edition is now available

The book traces the development of the salutogenic model of health and fleshes out the central concepts, most notably coping resources and the sense of coherence that differentiate salutogenesis from pathogenesis.

ERC Synergy Grant | New research
Counting on fingers

Count – and I know who you are

Humans are the only species that uses symbols to express quantities, and researchers now want to find out why number systems vary so much between cultures.