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Geophysical Institute

News archive for Geophysical Institute

How can the academic community make an impact to get vital information on climate change across to decision-makers? By engaging in the type of quiet science advice provided by Benjamin Pfeil and his team at the University of Bergen.
Camille Li is editor for the new open-access EGU publication.
Earlier this August Statsraad Lehmkuhl sailed to Arendal, combining the voyage with a climate and renewable energy conference in collaboration with the Bjerknes Centre
From the 21st August, you can use your student/employee card to access the library until 22:00 on weekdays and 08:00-20:00 on Saturdays and Sundays
Climate simulation models include more and more processes – not only physical, but also biogeochemical cycles. Can single individuals keep an overview of the major factors governing climate change? Christoph Heinze has led a study that can help you. He presents the new article here.
Evaporation demands energy, condensation releases energy. Both can affect the development of midlatitude cyclones, often associated with clouds and rain. A new study addresses how evaporation of rain contributes to cyclone development. Lead author Kristine Flacké Haualand explains.
The program for the fall 2019 is being planned as we speak, and we can already tell that a number of different topics will be addressed.
Our program this spring has been diverse, covering a broad range of topics and disciplines. Here in this newsletter you will find a short summary of a couple of our meetings and seminars, in addition to the thoughts of one of our most recent master’s students and an outlook on the semester to come.
Allocations from the Academy Agreement between UiB and Equinor were announced on 28.06.2019. Four research projects on offshore wind received funding. In addition BOW was allocated funding for two Associate Professor II positions.
«The mid-latitudes are one big, chaotic mess”, says Camille Li.
SNOWISO field season started at the EastGRIP camp, on the Greenland Ice Sheet.
The Gulfstream makes northern Europe warmer by transporting heat. This is well known. New research shows that the sea surface temperature also affects storm tracks as far away as the Pacific.
The seminar that was held the 13th of February covered a broad range of aspects in relation to Smart Cities. The video of the seminar and the slide deck here can be found here.
A newly published study in Nature Communications shows an important new understanding of the climate system that will allow us to better understand past climate variability. The results were uncovered by expeditions between the North Pole and Antarctica.
On 3-8 March, 29 participants and 10 expert lecturers attended a winter school at Kvalheim Fritid on Radøy near Bergen.
An international research project has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean from the atmosphere between 1994 and 2007.
Did you know that the El Niño Southern Oscillation is a phenomenon involving two-way interactions among the tropical basins? Noel Keenlyside writes about a recent study he has contributed to.
The living conditions for marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may dramatically worsen by the end of the century. More acidic water can make their territories shallower.

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