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Geophysical Institute

GFI og Rhododendron

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within four resarch groups:

We also host the Energy Lab and do research and development on renewable energy (solar, wind and water).

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

News
SNOWISO

Getting ready for Antarctica

“I’m looking forward to going back into the field”, says PhD student Sonja Wahl, who recently returned from her first fieldwork on Greenland.

Net based course
Kerim Hestnes Nisancioglu

World-class MOOC on drivers of climate change

Three-week course in October guided by UiB and Bjerknes Professors.

NEWS
Dudgeon Offshore wind

Launching offshore wind centre in Bergen

The Bergen Offshore Wind Centre officially opened on 13 September. For the University of Bergen this is an important part of our contribution to society, according to Energy Director Kristin Guldbrandsen Frøysa.

The Nansen Legacy
Arven etter Nansen

Great data from the first Nansen Legacy-expedition

At the Shanghai-ranking 2018, the field Oceanography at the University of Bergen is ranked number ten in the world. That pleases Professor in Oceanography at UiB and The Bjerknes Centre, Ilker Fer, who recently returned from the first expedition in the Nansen Legacy research project.

New research
Stillehavet_temp

Pacific impact on the Arctic larger than expected

Lea Svendsen was at first surprised to see how the Pacific impacted winter temperatures in the Arctic. Now, her results have been published in Nature Climate Change, while the Pacific transitions into a warm phase again.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.