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GFI og Rhododendron

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within five resarch groups:

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

Climatechange
Isvarsling

Predicting Arctic sea ice

When a fishing vessel sets course for Bear Island, the captain knows only which areas are ice-covered now, not where the ice will be tomorrow. In a few years, sea ice predictions will make routing easier and safer.

Meteorology
forskningsfly

Following the flight of water

In a large scale airplane campaign researchers will – for the first time – follow water molecules from they take off from the ocean until they have landed as rain or snow in Norway.

New Research
stefanie_semper_jgrocean

Following the Gulf Stream's little finger

The North Icelandic Irminger Current may be seen as the Gulf Stream’s little finger. Follow this finger to its tip in Stefanie Semper's account of her new study.
News
Clemens Spensberger

Predicting weather events months before they happen

Clemens Spensberger's research aims to drastically improve prediction of weather incidents, by describing and establishing climate links between different geographical regions.

New Research
golfstrommen_lars_henrik

The Gulf Stream Extension has increased steadily over the last century

The heat transport into the Nordic Seas has increased steadily in volume and temperature over the last century, according to recent study.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Bergen Offshore Wind Center and the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.