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Geophysical Institute

GFI og Rhododendron

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within five resarch groups:

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

New research
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New observations will influence how we interpret paleo-climate archives

A newly published study in Nature Communications shows an important new understanding of the climate system that will allow us to better understand past climate variability. The results were uncovered by expeditions between the North Pole and Antarctica.

Winter school
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Winter School on the Influence of Diabatic Processes on Atmospheric Development

On 3-8 March, 29 participants and 10 expert lecturers attended a winter school at Kvalheim Fritid on Radøy near Bergen.

New research
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The rising importance of pan-tropical interactions

Did you know that the El Niño Southern Oscillation is a phenomenon involving two-way interactions among the tropical basins? Noel Keenlyside writes about a recent study he has contributed to.

New research
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Southern Ocean acidification creates shallower horizon for marine organisms

The living conditions for marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may dramatically worsen by the end of the century. More acidic water can make their territories shallower.

News
Isbjørn på Svalbard

Svalbard has experienced warming of 4°C the last 50 years

Since 1971 Svalbard has experienced a winter warming of 7°C. This has caused major changes, and there is an urgent need to plan for the future, states the new “Climate in Svalbard 2100” report.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Bergen Offshore Wind Center and the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.