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Geophysical Institute

GFI og Rhododendron

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within five resarch groups:

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

New research
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Barents Sea ice cover may influence Asian highlands

It is far from the Arctic to Tibet. A new study shows how variations in the sea ice cover may influence the transport of air pollution into the Tibetan Plateau.
New research
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Tidally-forced lee waves drive turbulent mixing

Observations north of Svalbard reveal a pathway of energy transfer from tidal currents to turbulent mixing.

The One Ocean Expedition
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Learning on deck from Aruba to Havana

From autumn 2021, Kerim Nisancioglu's climate and sustainability course enters a whole new campus: aboard the tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl, in the Caribbean. But before she sets sail, Meike Becker will install observation instruments to collect data from the sea surface all around the world.
New research
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Norwegian Atlantic Slope Current along the Lofoten Escarpment

The structure and transport of the slope current at the Lofoten Escarpment are described for the first time using 14-month long mooring records.

SDG 14: SUSTAINABLE OCEAN SERIES
Portrait of Benjamin Pfeil, leader of the Bjerknes Climate Data Centre at the University of Bergen

Providing data to save our ocean

Reporting on ocean acidification data directly targeting the Sustainable Development Goals is all in a day’s work for Benjamin Pfeil and his data group at the University of Bergen.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Bergen Offshore Wind Center and the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.