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Geophysical Institute

GFI og Rhododendron

Storms, ocean currents, raindrops, avalanches, heat waves and CO2 exchange, it all boils down to physics. At Geophysical Institute we explore the driving forces of nature.

We do research and education in meteorology, oceanography and climate, within five resarch groups:

Make your studies here

Are extreme weather events a result of climate change? Can all ice on the earth melt, and what will happen in that case? How will global climate change impact the climate in Norway? Where does the Gulf Stream come from and how do ocean circulations work? How can we tell what the weather is going to be like by just looking at the clouds? Why is it warmer in Norway compared to other places at similar latitudes?
We will teach you how to find the answers.

Here you find our study programme. For more information, contact the student advisors.
Want to know more about the student life at our Institute and the GFI social activities?
By the way, do you know that the job opportunities are very good for our students?

DYNAMITE-project
low_pressure_system_over_iceland

Seeking order in the atmospheric chaos

«The mid-latitudes are one big, chaotic mess”, says Camille Li.

SNOWISO-project
snowiso_fly

Going to Greenland to interpret 100.000 year old ice

SNOWISO field season started at the EastGRIP camp, on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

New research
Golfstrømmen_Labradorhavet_Grønlandshavet

Ocean currents shape the weather

The Gulfstream makes northern Europe warmer by transporting heat. This is well known. New research shows that the sea surface temperature also affects storm tracks as far away as the Pacific.

Winter school
Winter_School_Chess_2019_all

Winter School on the Influence of Diabatic Processes on Atmospheric Development

On 3-8 March, 29 participants and 10 expert lecturers attended a winter school at Kvalheim Fritid on Radøy near Bergen.

New research
ice_ocean

New observations will influence how we interpret paleo-climate archives

A newly published study in Nature Communications shows an important new understanding of the climate system that will allow us to better understand past climate variability. The results were uncovered by expeditions between the North Pole and Antarctica.

We contribute to

Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and we host the Bergen Offshore Wind Center and the Research school on changing climates in the coupled earth system (CHESS).

Our forefathers

Vilhelm Bjerknes, Harald Sverdrup and Bjørn Helland Hansen. Polar expeditions and the theoretical foundation of modern weather forecasting. A wind of history blows through the corridors of our institute.