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News archive for Geophysical Institute

Rector Dag Rune Olsen visited the University of the South Pacific to strengthen ties between Bergen and Fiji. Whilst in the Pacific, he also met with UiB exchange students.
Analysis of cyclone tracks and precyclogenesis flow conditions show us that El Niño can shift the preferred cyclogenesis position over the Gulf Stream which influences the cyclone’s track across the North Atlantic. The results are published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.
Based on a unique dataset collected during a research cruise to the Irminger Sea in April 2015, a new paper, published in Nature Communications, reveals a strong link between atmospheric forcing, deep convection, ocean ventilation and anthropogenic carbon sequestration.
The University of Bergen will this fall and the next spring compete against 4 other universities in Europe in making the best 2 day weather forecasts. Participants will predict maximum and minimum temperature as well as precipitation.
The Gulf Stream transports warm water towards Northern Europe. This flow is driven by northward flows replacing water that sink in the Norwegian Sea, but also by the wind blowing over the sea. In some regions, the wind can be the strongest driver. Carina Bringedal studies the role of the winds at the entrance of the Norwegian Sea
What if we could predict how much sea ice there will be in the Nordic Seas in two years? Or twenty? In the gap between ordinary weather forecasts and climate projections, there is a dialog between the ocean and the atmosphere. Without understanding how they interact, we cannot predict variations in climate, says Marius Årthun.
North Pole explorers send summer photos of melt water pools and cracks that become harder and harder to cross. If they had winter expeditions, they would see that ice covers as much of the Arctic Ocean as in the past. Only the Barents Sea and the region just north of Svalbard have lost winter ice.
Sometimes things are so complicated that you're forced to think simple. Erwin Lambert is an expert at that. With a few, plain boxes he tries to calculate how a rainy future will influence Atlantic currents.
What will the earth’s climate be like in the future? Noel Keenlyside works hard to let us know.
Are you interested in what drives the climate systems and changes? Or would you like to learn more about how to prevent the development of diseases and injuries in workplaces in developing countries? Follow one of our massive open online courses this autumn!
New observations recently published in Nature Communications show that warm deep water also reaches the large Filchner ice shelf in the southern Weddell Sea.
Professor Terje Tvedt criticizes Social Sciences for being “water blind”.
Bergen is world-leading within marine research and climate research.
The NORPAN project gives Norwegian researchers and students the opportunity to visit Japanese and Norwegian institutions.
The Norwegian jetSTREAM (Atmospheric jet variability: linking STRucture, Evolution And Mechanisms) crew met for a three days’ workshop in Oxford March 16-18.
Are you a PhD candidate or junior researcher interested in climate change and water? Join us in Bergen in June!

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