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On UN Day 2018 – 24 October, the University of Bergen was announced as the official UNAI Hub for SDG14 – Life below water. Two years on, we look at what has been achieved during this time.
A new interdisciplinary project to create research leaders for marine sustainability is a prime part of the University of Bergen’s engagement with the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development.
Migration is a global phenomenon bringing both global benefits and global challenges.
BCEPS Director Ole Frithjof Norheim contributes to a paper in Science Magazine proposing an ethical framework for global COVID-19 vaccine allocation.
– Migration is an important field of law because legal status makes an enormous difference. If you have status as ‘citizen’ you are protected by the law in a completely different way than refugees and migrants.
How can the ocean provide knowledge and research for the medicine and food of the future? The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the world community that biodiversity is key to securing solutions for the future and how dependent we are of the secrets of the ocean.
In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the research programme GRIP launched a series of interviews on global inequality in March 2020. With more than 20 interviews out, GRIP is now looking at how to bring the debate on inequality into the mainstream.
Postdoctoral Fellow Joanna Siekiera reports on a new summer school educating the science diplomats of the future, with participation from around the world.
Research Schools are meant to be dynamic meeting places. For the first time, students attending Bergen Summer Research School (BSRS) 2020 had to manage this digitally. The feedback thus far indicates the experience has gone well.
Biodiversity is one of the key issues in the debate for sustaining and developing our common ocean resources. Law researchers at the University of Bergen have long been engaged in judicial questions outside national marine territories.
Ocean science is at the core of the University of Bergen’s science diplomacy activities. By juxtaposing the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda, the university and its partners are quietly providing policymakers with research-based knowledge for global sustainability.
The COVID-19 outbreak of 2020 forced Bergen Research Summer School (BSRS) to transform from a physical to a virtual gathering of international students.
“The ocean has enormous potential. It's not only that we can, but also because we have to produce more from the ocean if we are to avoid climate change,” said Vidar Helgesen aboard tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl on World Ocean Day.
Reporting on ocean acidification data directly targeting the Sustainable Development Goals is all in a day’s work for Benjamin Pfeil and his data group at the University of Bergen.
In October 2018 the University of Bergen was given a lead role on SDG14, Life below water, by United Nations Academic Impact. Now the university has been asked to present a four-part series for inspiration on ocean research and education. The UN distributes the series globally.
How do climate and land-use changes influence fish catch in lakes? That has been at the centre of a major international study which urges policymakers to increase funding for land and water management to create a more sustainable fisheries industry.
Bergen Summer Research School opened 8 June with a record number of participants. Together with some of Bergen's best research milieus, they will explore how their research can contribute to solving global challenges. This year they meet online - watch the many public lectures on YouTube.
The University of Bergen is on track with the deliverables promised in SDG Action 28818, which has now been updated to include further deliverables towards the 2030 Agenda.

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