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PhD Candidate Kari Anne Drangsland, IMER's PhD representative on the board and IMER Junior Scholar Network member, will be defending her thesis on Thursday, 21 January.
Building on years of collaboration with institutions of research and higher education, the University of Bergen ends year with funding for a record number of new projects with partner institutions in the South.
13 projects from the University of Bergen have received funding for a total value of 250 million Norwegian kroner from the NORHED II programme.
The University of Bergen is involved in four new projects to receive funding from the Worldwide Universities Network’s Research Development Fund, which focusses on global challenges towards the 2030 Agenda.
Ronald is the coordinator of the long-lasting cooperation between UiB and Makerere and a former PhD student at UiB. He tells us about the situation with COVID19 in Uganda and how he prepares for Christmas.
At the Diplomacy 2.0 event, Joanna Siekiera from the University of Bergen spoke on the subject of water diplomacy as a field of science diplomacy.
“It is vital for Norway to have a national action plan for the Sustainable Development Goals and only natural for academia to inhabit a key role by contributing with research-based knowledge and critical thinking on the goals,” says Vice-Rector Annelin Eriksen at the University of Bergen.
A global alliance of leading climate research universities is urging the G20 countries to embrace a build back better strategy for the post-pandemic recovery. This includes prioritising net zero emissions and planning for a more circular economy.
How can scientific knowledge on the treasures of the ocean contribute to informing policy? This was the key topic at the second Ocean Sustainability Bergen Conference.
Every year, several countries present their Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) to show their progress in implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. But how can science play an integral part in these proceedings?
The launch at the University Aula concluded with two large panels representing the diversity of scientific milieus tackling global challenges in Bergen. Together they will work to make Bergen the place of choice for students seeking knowledge and skills to help solve global challenges.
On UN Day 2018 – 24 October, the University of Bergen was announced as the official UNAI Hub for SDG14 – Life below water. Two years on, we look at what has been achieved during this time.
A new interdisciplinary project to create research leaders for marine sustainability is a prime part of the University of Bergen’s engagement with the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development.
Migration is a global phenomenon bringing both global benefits and global challenges.
BCEPS Director Ole Frithjof Norheim contributes to a paper in Science Magazine proposing an ethical framework for global COVID-19 vaccine allocation.
– Migration is an important field of law because legal status makes an enormous difference. If you have status as ‘citizen’ you are protected by the law in a completely different way than refugees and migrants.
How can the ocean provide knowledge and research for the medicine and food of the future? The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the world community that biodiversity is key to securing solutions for the future and how dependent we are of the secrets of the ocean.
In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the research programme GRIP launched a series of interviews on global inequality in March 2020. With more than 20 interviews out, GRIP is now looking at how to bring the debate on inequality into the mainstream.

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