Home
WAIT

News archive for WAIT

In April, WAIT researcher Shahram Khosravi was interviewed about the pandemic and borders as part of a series of conversations called Four Rooms.
In this blog we reflect on how the Covid-19 pandemic is affecting migrants with precarious legal status in Europe, with a particular focus on Norway, Germany and France - countries in which we have been doing long term ethnographic fieldwork in the WAIT-project.
Reflections from researchers at the WAIT project on the complexity of waiting in pandemic times.
Ph.D candidate Kari Anne Drangsland has published the article "Waiting as a redemptive state: The ‘Lampedusa in Hamburg’ and the offer from the Hamburg government" in acclaimed journal Time and Society.
In Israel, as in the United States, children have become pawns in government efforts to expel migrants -- despite clear evidence that arresting, detaining, and deporting children violates their human rights and has long-term traumatic effects. Policies like these demand our swift, strong, and emphatic condemnation.
PhD candidate Kari Anne Drangsland has contributed to the WAIT project with ethnographic field research in Hamburg, Germany, and in this brief outline she answers a few questions on her engagement in WAIT.
Professor Odin Lysaker is one of the core researchers in the WAIT group. In this brief outline of his work, he answers a few questions about his own involvement in WAIT.
Knut Graw (University of Leuven) has been a guest researcher at Centre for Women's and Gender Research this Spring.
Professor Ghassan Hage on waiting as an analytical category in migration studies
February 6th - 9th the researchers for the WAIT project gathered in Athens.
Read the newest blog-entry from PhD. candidate Halvar A. Kjærre on his research amongst Afghans in Europe.
–Meeting the migrants have made a big impression, but as anthropologist it is also through these meetings that I think best, says Christine M. Jacobsen, researcher and project leader for the WAIT project. Through ethnographic research, the project examines how laws, norms and power relations structure irregular migrants' experience of time and their possibility to carry out their life... Read more
What are the moral consequences of irregular migrants’ prolonged waiting? In this latest blog-entry, philosopher and professor Odin Lysaker reflects upon the ethical role of time in the case of refugees. The text is based on his contribution to the WAIT research project.
Read Kari Anne Drangsland's reflections on how silence and the lack of the ability to provide comfort to her informants is telling of the normative structures that shape irregular migrants' experience of waiting.
In the latest blog-entry from the WAIT-project, Marry-Anne Karlsen writes about how irregularized migrants' sense of waiting is produced, where it comes from, and how it is lived by following Ruth, an irregularized migrant in Oslo.
Social Anthropologist and WAIT-researcher Shahram Khosravi is currently carrying out fieldwork on irregular migrants in Stockholm. Read his field-report on their experience of waiting, and the effects that prolonged waiting has on asylum seekers.
Read the first dispatch from the field from social anthropologist and project leader of WAIT, Christine M. Jacobsen. She has spent the summer months carrying out fieldwork among irregular migrants of Marseille. In this report from the field she discusses the temporal dimensions of the securitisation of the border between France and Italy.
Shahram Khosravi from Stockholm University has recently published his newest ethnographic book, Precarious Lives: Waiting and Hope in Iran, an "intricate and moving portrait of contemporary Iranian life," where he elegantly weaves together insights from his studies of Iranian youth culture and migration studies.

Pages