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SDG Conference Bergen
SDG Conference Bergen 2022

Day Zero: Wednesday 9 February 2022

Day Zero is a free, all-digital day of events to kick off the SDG Conference Bergen. We will gradually roll out the programme until 11 January.

Main content

The topic of the SDG Conference Bergen 2022 is Ways of Knowing, Modes of Living: Dialogues across a fragmented Earth for the 2030 Agenda. The challenges and existential threats that underlie the sustainable development goals, demand action. How do we find new and innovative ways to develop sustainable actions rooted in the SDGs?

If ways of knowing are so diverse, which ones should guide our actions? The conference will trace paths within and among different ways of knowing to explore the transformative ambition of the 2030 Agenda.

Day Zero is an academic festival with creative spaces (workshops, exhibitions, debates, etc.) presenting work of relevance to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). We invite a diverse audience to participate, whether you are a student or work in academia or research, civil society, non-profit, in a start-up company, large corporation or small business.

The events on Day Zero are digital, open to all and entrance is free. As before, Day Zero starts with an Opening Plenary Session, followed by three waves of 90-minute workshop sessions. 

PROGRAMME

08:30 Registration and networking

09.00 Greetings and opening by Sofie Høgestøl and Dorothy Dankel

09.15 Day Zero Keynote

We Got This: Five Reasons for Optimism in Securing Sustainability
Roger Pielke, Jr.
Professor, University of Colorado Boulder, USA

10:30 Break with networking

Parallel sessions:

11:00 - 12:30 

North-South Linkages: Views from the South  

Jose Frantz, University of the Western Cape Team  
jfrantz@uwc.ac.za  

Contributing to changing the narrative as we all strive to reach the 2030 SDG goals is essential. How do we flip the script so that the voices from the South are heard? Perhaps sharing exemplars and ideas and co-creating solutions will help contribute to the debate. As part of this workshop and conversation we share exemplars from the South focusing on key areas that need focusing on.

As part of this workshop we aim to focus on enhancing societies and economies through an interdisciplinary approach. Through work done at UWC we aim to share the idea of how collective thinking and engagement can address two key areas that challenge society in South Africa.

Exemplar 1: South Africa has the highest unemployment rate in world at 34%. A country such as Norway has an unemployment rate of 4%. Why is the unemployment rate in Norway so low.

Exemplar 2: A second example is the need for leadership. Delivering on the SDGs needs a focus on leadership to drive this agenda.

Exemplar 3: SANORD: South -North exemplar of collaborative partnerships for the SDG's.

Exemplar 4: Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Social innovation and entrepreneurship can be used to drive the SDGs.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 5: Gender Equality 
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Voices on Lifestyle in a Climate Perspective  

Kjersti Fløttum, CLIMLIFE project, LINGCLIM group, UiB
kjersti.flottum@uib.no   

Climate change concerns all aspects of our lives and affects how we think about our lifestyle as consumers, our political behaviour as citizens and how we perceive the future of humanity. In addition to political measures, the willingness among individuals seems to be a prerequisite for necessary actions. However, citizens require better guidance and facilitation for “green choices” from politicians; and the youth, who will have to live with the consequences of climate change today and in the future, are calling for more action.

We suppose that people’s motivation to make a personal effort is affected by how they perceive the efficiency of climate policies, on the one hand; on the other, that politicians’ support for climate policies is strongly influenced by how they perceive the citizens’ motivation to change their lifestyle. And all seem influenced by how the motivations of the other part are represented in media coverage.

In this event, we will focus on different voices: 1) the rhetoric of people’s (notably young people’s) motivations, 2) how politicians perceive and prioritize people’s everyday matters and 3) how journalists consider covering everyday lifestyle matters.

The event is organized by the CLIMLIFE project, focusing on lifestyle matters in a climate perspective, affiliated to the cross-disciplinary LINGCLIM research group, at the Department of foreign languages, University of Bergen (UiB).

Panellists:- Professor Kjersti Fløttum, Head of CLIMLIFE and LINGCLIM, Department of foreign languages, UiB: Lifestyle in a climate change perspective, An introduction.- Postdoctoral fellow, Ida Vikøren Andersen, Department of foreign languages, UiB: Voices of young people - Doctoral fellow, Runa Falck, Department of foreign languages, UiB: Voices of politicians- Professor Dag Elgesem, Department of Information Science and Media Studies, UiB: Voices of journalists- Senior Lecturer Maria Wolrath-Söderberg, Södertörn University, Sweden

Most of us are well aware of the climate crisis, and want to live sustainable lives. Still, we often have hight emissions. How do we reason when making climate harmful choices? And what impacts those who change, to get over the threshold?

This event is relevant for:
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action

Hvordan endre innbyggernes forbruksmønstre?

Stina Oseland, Climate agency (Klimaetaten), Bergen municipality  
stina.oseland@bergen.kommune.no   

Byer viser vei i klimaomstillingen, og har kommet langt innen mange sektorer. Men, å kutte utslipp er også å endre innbyggernes forbruksmønster. Hvordan kan kommunene adressere og støtte forbruksendringer på husholdningsnivå? Uten moralisering, men likevel med seriøse kutt i utslipp?

En kommune må lage strukturer, mønstre og systemer slik at konsumet og handlingene med det minste klimafotavtrykket blir de enkleste, og helst de billigste. Hvordan ser disse strukturene og systemene ut?

I denne sesjonen inviterer Klimaetaten til innlegg og diskusjon. Vi ønsker oss også konkrete innspill til hva kommuner kan og bør gjøre for å påvirke konsum i en klimavennlig retning.

Dette arrangementet er relevant for:
SDG 11: Bærekraftige byer og lokalsamfunn 
SDG 13: Stoppe klimaendringene

The environmental and ethical aspects of food

Silje Bue, NHHS Green team
silj-bu@hotmail.com

Former leader of NHHS Green team, Silje Bue, and CEO of World Saving Hustle, Martin Skadal are going to talk about the environmental impact of our industrialized way of producing meat, as well as the ethical aspect related to it. How much of the world's emissions are related to agriculture, and how big is the potential to cut emissions by changing what we eat? Is it fair to treat animals the way we do and is it sustainable?

These questions, as well as facts and myths related to a plant-based lifestyle, such as deficiency diseases and protein sources, will be discussed in this 90-minute seminar.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 15: Life on Land

Productive disturbance - formation and sustainability in higher education

Marit Ubbe, The Norwegian Directorate for Higher Education and Skills
marit.ubbe@hkdir.no

The complexity of global challenges and the interconnectedness of the sustainability goals demand a conscious and active understanding of the world. This session will present different perspectives on the concept of formation and how it can be used as a structured approach to raise awareness of the complexities of sustainable development. Unsettling handed down assumptions, revealing conflicting solutions to wicked problems, and exploring ideological discourses the students are given the possibility to contribute to what is relevant knowledge.

Speakers:
Professor Eivind Engebretsen, SHE - Centre for Sustainable Healthcare Education, University of Oslo
Associate Professor Jan Reinert Karlsen, Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities, University of Bergen
Professor in climate change, sustainability and education Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences 

The session will include open discussions.

This event is relevant for all the SDGs.

10 Wishes from School Children for a Healthy Ocean  

René Wik and 3rd grade pupils at Christi Krybbe Skoler  
Rene.Wik@bergen.kommune.no   

Third grade pupils from an elementary school at the west coast of Norway share their thoughts on the most pressing issues related to the health of our oceans. They will put forward 10 wishes for a healthier ocean and propose 3 solutions to work toward the fulfilment of SDG14 – Life Below Water.

The pupils will present their messages through a panel discussion (panel to be announced), and through artistic means. They hope to meet with relevant stakeholders who share their visions, and who are interested in helping to bring the visions to reality.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water

Skulle du ønske det var lettere å finne forskning knyttet til bærekraftmålene?  

Caroline Armitage / Marta Lorenz, Universitetsbiblioteket i Bergen
caroline.armitage@uib.no     

Skulle du ønske det var lettere å finne forskning knyttet til bærekraftmålene? Kunne du tenke deg å bruke forskning mer om den var enklere å få tak i? Da vil vi gjerne snakke med deg, enten du er student, forsker, lærer, bibliotekar, ansatt i kommune, næringsliv, en fagforening eller NGO, eller bare generelt interessert.

Vi inviterer personer som er engasjert i bærekraftmålene til å delta i diskusjon. Vi vil gjerne høre hvordan dere bruker og finner forskning om bærekraftsmålene, og hva dere kunne ha nytte av i et verktøy til formålet. Å gi enkel, åpen tilgang til forskningspublikasjoner relatert til FNs bærekraftmål for alle i samfunnet er viktig for å spre kunnskap og gjøre det mulig å nå nettopp disse målene. Men ofte er forskningspublikasjonene vanskelige å oppdrive, særlig for alle dem som ikke tilhører en utdannings- eller forskningsinstitusjon.

I vårt prosjekt, «Bærekraftforskning for alle», skal vi bygge en portal som gir oversikt over forskning knyttet til bærekraftmålene, med lenker til åpne versjoner. Der skal det være lett å finne forskning om et undermål eller tema.

I verkstedet vil vi gi en kort presentasjon av portalen og ideen bak prosjektet, før vi deler oss opp i diskusjonsgrupper. Vi kommer til å bruke innspill fra verkstedet i arbeidet med å utforme portalen som et nyttig og lettbrukt verktøy. Har du spørsmål, ta gjerne kontakt!

Dette arrangementet er relevant for:
SDG 1: Utrydde fattigdom 
SDG 2: Utrydde sult
SDG 3: God helse og livskvalitet 
SDG 4: God utdanning 
SDG 7: Ren energi for alle
SDG 11: Bærekraftige byer og lokalsamfunn 
SDG 13: Stoppe klimaendringene
SDG 14: Livet under vann 
SDG 17: Samarbeid for å nå målene

Teaching the SDGs—From Knowledge to Skills

Kai Grieg, United Nations Association of Norway, Vestland
kai.grieg@fn.no

How to go from knowledge on what to do, to actually fostering the skills needed? 

Target 4.7 of the SDGs emphasizes that all learners should acquire both the knowledge and the skills needed to promote sustainable development. United Nations Association of Norway has been teaching sustainable development for several decades. In this session we will share some of the most important lessons learned. 

This session is for educators at all levels of the educational system and for students that want to look into how teaching on the SDGs can be improved. 

This event is relevant for:
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water

12:30 - 13:30 Break with networking

13:30 - 15:00

Sustainability of Aquaculture Feed and Ingredients 

Amund Maage, Marine Director, UiB  
amund.maage@uib.no   

More foods from the oceans and aquatic environments have been an important aspect for increasing health and healthy food availability. However the feed ingredients have come under criticism for not been sustainable on basis of volume, transport and land use in terms of terrestrial products.

This event puts focus on possible alternative marine and land based products which can differentiate from mainly soy based feed to more marine or more locally produced ingredients. Examples could be marine low trophic alternatives such as micro algae, blue mussels, aquatic macro plants, mesopelagic fish but also locally produced terrestrial products and food waste. The latter could also lead to a more circular economy in the aquaculture business.

Programme:
Introduction to challenges of high volume high quality sustainable fish feed
Amund Maage, Marine Director at UiB and former Head of Research at NIFES (now Institute of Marine Research), will introduce the field. For several year, Maage led the Food Authority project on Norwegian Fish Feed Monitoring. He holds a PhD in fish nutrition.

More locally produced marine ingredients such as blue mussels and kelp to improve the sustainability of Norwegian fish farming
Harald Sveier is Research and Innovation Manager in the large stock listed seafood company Lerøy Seafood Group ASA. He holds a PhD in fish Nutrition from UiB/NIFES. Sveier will focus his talk on new marine ingredients underdevelopment in Lerøy with focus on blue mussels and kelp.

The important oils in fish feed. Potential of local production of lipid rich raw materials.
Bente E. Torstensen is Division Director for aquaculture at NOFIMA, a division that covers the whole chain of seafood production. Torstensen holds a PhD in fish nutrition. She has been Head of Research and Research Director at NIFES, and Global R&D manager of feed and fish performance in MOWI.

Insects, the quintessential circular feed ingredient. Important lessons learned on the path to  a more circular solution for sustainable fish feed.
Erik-Jan Lock is research group leader for Feed and Nutrition at IMR and is working on both the legal aspects of feed raw materials (“licence to operate”) and innovations into fish feed. He has led innovative projects on the possible use of farmed insects as a new ingredient in fish feed.

The session is summarized through a discussion on future research and legal needs to achieve goals on sustainability and increased Norwegian aquaculture production. This will be led by Marine Dean and professor Øyvind Fiksen.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 15: Life on Land 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Parterapi - bærekraftig samarbeid

Maria Handal, UN Global Compact
maria.handal@globalcompact.no

Tiden fram til 2030 er knapp. Bærekraftsmålene fordrer nye og styrkede partnerskap for å nå målene - både globalt, nasjonalt og lokalt. Hvordan kan akademia og arbeidslivet samarbeide bedre?

UN Global Compact, FNs organisasjon for bærekraftig næringsliv, inviterer til parterapi mellom akademia og næringslivet. I løpet av litt over en time skal vi utforske parforholdet. Forhåpentligvis kommer vi litt nærmere å løse noen av barrierene.

UN Global Compact er FNs organisasjon for bærekraftig næringsliv og verdens største bedriftsinitiativ for bærekraft. Over 12 000 bedrifter er medlemmer globalt og over 300 av dem i Norge. UNGC har lokale organisasjoner i 158 land.

Dette arrangementet er relevant for:
SDG 17: Samarbeid for å nå målene

Open Research Agenda for Climate Transformation  

Brooke Wilkerson and Jakob Grandin, CET/Arqus  
brooke.wilkerson@uib.no   

Open Research Agenda Setting (ORAS) is a process of engaging stakeholders in charting out areas of interest and developing priorities for research. ORAS is especially relevant for urban climate transformation, where the research agenda and outputs can have a direct impact on people’s lives and livelihoods, and where people’s lived experiences and insights can make a valuable contribution to identifying research questions.

In this workshop, we will involve participants in developing an agenda for urban climate transformation research. The overarching challenge will first be introduced with short presentations by decisionmakers and researchers working in this field in Bergen. Participants will then be introduced to activities such as systems mapping or scenario development that will help identify areas where further research or knowledge sharing is needed.

Through the workshop, participants will gain a greater understanding of the challenges of urban climate transformation from multiple perspectives and contribute to a research agenda that will be disseminated at UiB and through the Arqus network.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 13: Climate Action

Sustainable Development and Global Value Chains  

Fabian Rocha Aponte, SINTEF Industry 
fabian.rocha.aponte@sintef.no   

Addressing the interlinkages and trade-offs between different SDGs across global value chains (GVC) is fundamental for promoting sustainable development. Direct and indirect impacts on SDGs appear in all stages of value chains, from the extraction of raw materials to the operation of businesses, the final use and end-of-life management of products with different effects on the environment, society, and the economy. Thus, these interlinkages at a global scale calls for a variety of modelling approaches to properly capture the interactions in global value chains.

This session will present and discuss the interlinkages and trade-offs on SDG indicators across GVCs. We will feature researchers working with sustainability impact assessment, evaluating the effects of current and new technologies in cross-border SDG indicators.

Afterward, researchers and practitioners working on SDG implementation will share their experiences and insights about their challenges and outcomes. The session will end with questions and open discussion.

Join us to learn and contribute about the relevance of understanding SDG interlinkages across global value chains!

This event is relevant for:
SDG 1: No Poverty 
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 5: Gender Equality 
SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation 
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy 
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 15: Life on Land 
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Leaving No Child and No Adolescent Behind  

Elina Troscenko, GRIP, Action for Children's Environments Trust, Equity for Children
elina.troscenko@uib.no   

“Leaving No Child and No Adolescent Behind” is the call of a new book edited by Sudeshna Chatterjee, Alberto Minujin and Katie Hodgkinson. It shines a spotlight on the world’s most vulnerable children and adolescents living in poverty and exclusion.

The book draws on experiences from some 35 countries and provides in-depth analysis of rich empirical evidence while reflecting on the meaning of ‘inclusion’ for children and adolescents who are often left behind. It reminds us that SDG targets and goals cannot be met unless we focus attention on pockets of inequity and deprivation. The book also provides unique insights on how knowledge, information, data collection, measurement and monitoring make the realities of children’s and adolescents’ lives more visible.

This event will use the book as a springboard for discussion on new analyses and policies to fight poverty, exclusion, and violence against children to measure and track progress against SDG targets. The editors and some of the contributing authors will discuss some key ideas and invite participants to share their experiences of strategies and innovations for implementing the SDGs.

Participants:     

  • Sudeshna Chatterjee (Founder, Action for Children’s Environments)
  • Alberto Minujin (Professor at the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs at The New School)
  • Marguerite Daniel (Associate Professor, Department of Health Promotion and Development, UiB)
  • Enrique Delamonica (Senior Adviser Statistics and Monitoring-Child Poverty and Gender Equality, UNICEF HQ)
  • Thomas George (Global Lead for Urban, UNICEF HQ)
  • Elina Troscenko (Advisor, Global Research Programme on Inequality)

This event is relevant for:
SDG 1: No Poverty 
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Fair Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines Globally?

Bente E. MoenThorkild Tylleskär Centre for International Health, UiB
bente.moen@uib.no

We will hear status on the COVID-19 vaccination in 3 partner countries UiB has in Low- and middle income countries (Uganda, Pakistan, Guatemala), and discuss how we in Norway have tried to contribute to a fair distribution of the vaccines in the world. 

Introduction and presentation – Tylleskär and Moen

Information from three countries (10 minutes each with 5 minutes questions/discussion

  • Ahmad Wali, National TB Program, Health Ministry, Pakistan
  • Walter Flores, CEGSS-, Centre for the Study of Equity and Governance in Health Systems, Guatemala
  • Grace Ndeezi, Makerere University, Uganda

Presentations include:

  • General information about the country; population size
  • Impact of the pandemic; numbers of cases, restrictions in the society, hospitalizations, intensive care capacity/oxygen/respirators
  • Vaccination status; when and who and priorities

Discussion by panellists
Erlend Grønningen, PhD candidate at UiB
John-Arne Røttingen Ambassador for Global Health, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway

Moderator: Tylleskär and Moen

This event is relevant for:
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

Regenerative Business Transition Workshop  

Johanna Johansson, Ogoori AS  
Johanna@ogoori.eco  

The world is producing enormous amounts of waste every single day. Handling the trash requires money, time, and energy. Some of the waste is recycled, but too much is being incinerated, landfilled, or lost in nature. Cleaning up the waste after it´s been lost has proven both a difficult and costly task, while no one claims the responsibility.

Most of our society and our economic system promotes and supports the continued economic growth that is based on extracting resources, using it for a short period of time before disposing it to make room for new products. This way of constructing our societies have led to problems for our planet's health, our own health, and the survival for animals on land and below water.

During this workshop we will challenge the participants to find their "favourite" environmental problem, either in their lives or in their company. Together we will work at solving that problem. We will use Ogoori as a case for the method and guide the participants through a thought process where they tie their core business (or life) to concrete solutions to solve the problem.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

The Energy Transition: Cross-Disciplinary Teaching  

Christian Hermanrud, William Helland-Hansen and Atle Rotevatn, Department of Earth Science, UiB
christian.hermanrud@uib.no  

The energy transition is happening. It will include decision-masking that shapes our society, performed by governments, investors, companies and citizens. The decision will be based on knowledge from a multitude of disciplines. It is important that discipline experts are involved, and they need broad knowledge bases outside their main competence areas in order to identify the most desirable actions.

The course SDG207 (10 ECTS) aims at providing students with a multidisciplinary background for future decision making towards net-zero emission society. The course involves lecturers from a variety of faculties and institutes at UiB (including mathematics and natural sciences, social sciences law, psychology and politics) as well as external experts. The course was run as a Flipped Classroom course in 2021. The course is open to students from all UiB faculties, and a shortened and 100% digital version of the course (SDG607, 5 ECTS) is offered to participants outside the UiB.

SDG 207 targets students with at least two years of University background, irrespective of what discipline they study. SDG 607 targets individuals which have completed their education, including teachers and individuals who (want to) work with energy (and energy transition)-related challenges.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy 
SDG 13: Climate Action

Should the Climate Lawsuit have Ended Up in Court? 

Julie Klausen, Student committee at masters in sustainability  
julie.s.klausen@gmail.com  

Based on student-focused learning, we are intent on creating an interactive workshop/lecture or panel by us at the masters in sustainability.

We have focused on interdisciplinarity and ways of knowing this semester, and in doing this we have reflected on two specific cases. One of these, the climate lawsuit of 2020, was increasingly a wicked problem emerging before us as the research process continued.

We would like to present a form of module that engages and invites to discussion. We would like to discuss ways of knowing like law, politics, climate science and philosophy, risk management and how they all create different outlooks on cases like these.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 15: Life on Land 
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

15:00 - 15:30 Break with networking

15:30 - 17:00

Knowledge-driven actions: Transforming higher education for global sustainability

Digital Presentation of EGU2030 Report 

Contact: Annette Kathinka Servan, UiB
Annette.Servan@uib.no

The Global Independent Expert Group on the Universities and the 2030 Agenda (EGU2030) was launched in October 2020 by UNESCO in collaboration with the University of Bergen. The Expert Group’s mandate was to reflect on the necessary knowledge and transformations required for higher education institutions to contribute to the achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The result was a one-year collaboration of 14 experts from around the globe, whose report will be officially launched at the World Higher Education Conference (WHEC2022) to be held 18-20 May 2022. Their report is entitled: Knowledge-driven actions: Transforming higher education for global sustainability.

This digital event is not only a celebration of the work of the EGU2030, but an occasion to critically engage in discussions on the role of higher education institutions in achieving the 2030 Agenda. One of the preliminary aims of the report is to inspire and invigorate such discussions among the higher education community on why and how they can contribute to the SDGs, and not shying away from conversations on the challenges of doing so.

This event is an opportunity to do just that. In sharing about the EGU2030 report, we can begin to critically engage with its recommendations and implications. The aim is to encourage discussions and generate critical reflections about this report and the contributions of higher education institutions to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda.

This event is relevant for: 
SDG 4: Quality Education 

Indigenous Ways of Knowing  

Stian Antonsen, SAIH  
stian.antonsen@saih.no   

Academia often overlooks the knowledge that indigenous communities have built for centuries. The IPCC highlights indigenous knowledge as an important asset for solving the climate crisis. At the same time, we see that indigenous knowledge is given very little space in the SDGs and the Agenda 2030. But when indigenous people are excluded from the educational system, it does not only affect the individual, but the whole society. In this discussion, we want to explore the importance of indigenous research and knowledge in reaching the SDGs.

In a world with different ways of knowing, what kind of knowledge do we listen to and let guide our actions? What are the characteristics of indigenous approaches to research? How can we include indigenous knowledge and systems of knowledge production in mainstream academia and western institutions?

Tentative panel:

- A representative from the intercultural university URACCAN in Nicaragua or UAIIN in Colombia

- Representative from the Sami University of Applied Sciences- Roy Krøvel from OsloMet

- Introduction from Norhed

Moderator: Katrine Ringhus from SAIH

This event is relevant for: 
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 15: Life on Land

Skal jussen redde miljøet/klimaet? 

Anders Stokka Meling, Enviro  
anders.stokka.meling@gmail.com  

Arrangementet vil ta utgangspunkt i to sider ved denne problemstillingen.

Dagens rettssystem står overfor strukturelle utfordringer knyttet til å imøtegå de globale miljøutfordringene: Klimaproblemet (og andre miljøproblemer) er et kumulativt problem (i ekstrem forstand). "Alle" bidrar til problemet, og dermed blir nytteløst å foreta en vurdering av årsak-virkning.

Dette kalles gjerne "det miljørettslige paradoks". Man foretar handlinger som er fornuftige og ønskelige, men hvor resultat av den samlede effekten ikke er det. Dette gjør det vanskelig å angripe problemstillingen med vanlige ansvarsregler. Igjen står man med det som betegnes som "marginalisering" av retten. Det er dermed behov for nyskapning som kan utfordre de etablerte rettslige konstruksjonene.

På den andre siden ser vi tendenser hvor ny rett prøver å løse problem ved marginalisering av kumulative miljøproblemer. Internasjonal rett og klimasøksmål er interessante i denne sammenheng. Videre ser vi også forslag til nye rettslige strukturer for å bøte på den "markedssvikten" miljøproblemet representerer.

Vi ser for oss et seminar med både innlegg og debatt, med bidrag fra studenter, akademia og yrkesliv.

Denne sesjonen er relevant for:
SDG 13: Stoppe klimaendringene
SDG 14: Livet under vann 
SDG 15: Livet på land
SDG 16: Fred, rettferdighet og velfungerende institusjoner

Extended Partnerships for Actionable Knowledges  

Jeroen van der Sluijs, Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities, UiB  
jeroen.sluijs@uib.no   

This event presents and discusses the ideas of our ongoing SFF V bid for a Centre of Actionable Knowledges.

Pressing complex issues such as pandemics, chemical risks, climate adaptation and biodiversity loss exemplify society’s heavy reliance on institutionalised expertise to inform and justify action. But in deploying knowledge for action, a narrow selection of knowledge is privileged, while other knowledge is silenced. Faced with uncertainty, high stakes, disputed values and urgent decision-making, a plurality of knowledges must be considered when finding ways to properly scope the decision space.

Our proposed Centre for Excelence (CoE) will explore and assess whether a turn to a more inclusive and socially robust knowledge base, attentive to epistemic pluralism, can expand the range of policy options, avoid addressing the wrong problems and reduce unforeseen impacts. The CoE's mission will be to enable and catalyse a reform of the social organisation of expertise.

The event consists of short perspectives and discussions by the proposed PIs and other leading scholars on how to accommodate diversification of knowledge forms in the co-creation of the actionable knowledges.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Organising Bus Riders for Social Equality  

Rafael Rosales, Centre for Climate and Energy Transformation (CET), UiB  
rafael.rosales@uib.no   

Private car owners have their own interest union in Norway, as do cyclists, whilst bus drivers as a collective group do not. For this reason, a group of researchers joined forces with an art collective and started a Bus Riders’ Union (Bussbrukernes Landsforening). The goal of this union is to visualise the experiences of bus riders in Norway, including the benefits of riding the bus and the barriers they face to convenient bus travel.

Additionally, the union seeks to unite bus riders in their claims for improved investment on bus infrastructure. There is a tendency for the most vulnerable groups in society to be the ones who depend on bus infrastructure, as opposed to cycling, railways, or private vehicles. We therefore take into account how a bus riders’ union addresses issues of inequality, urban sustainability, and consumption.

We invite with us representatives from bus riders’ unions in the United States and Norwegian mobility companies to display how it is possible to pursue changes in transport systems. We seek insight from participants through a brainstorming activity that BLF can take forward.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption

Youth Innovation in the Decade of Action: Stories  

Omar Hernandez, UN Academic Impact  
omar.hernandez@un.org  

The event aims at highlighting the critical role of younger generations in addressing local and global challenges, particularly in these complex times derived from the COVID-19 pandemic, to advance the 2030 Agenda with innovative ideas and solutions.

Students have been role models on campuses and beyond, to show how small-scale projects can make a significant contribution to the SDGs.

We will hear stories from member institutions of the UN Academic Impact (UNAI), notably the SDG Hubs, but also from alumni of the UNAI-MCN Fellowship Program. 

This event is relevant for:
SDG 1: No Poverty 
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 5: Gender Equality 
SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation 
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy 
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 15: Life on Land 
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Students, (Dis)Play Your Science in a Public Arena  

Morgane Kerdoncuf, PhD student at UiB  
morgane.kerdoncuf@uib.no  

The aim of this workshop is to brainstorm around a student-led dissemination event around sustainability, open to the public. Many of you are involved in one or more UiB courses related to the Sustainable Development Goals agenda, where you discuss and investigate in groups on specific issues you decide to be of upmost importance for a more sustainable world. You present the outcomes of your work to the academic communities (students, researchers, technicians) with a manuscript and a poster, but how about pushing the idea a bit further by communicating your research to the public during a dedicated event?

What could be the ideas, tools or approaches to make your findings appealing for anyone a bit curious but without scientific education? How to convey your message in a fun and efficient way so it could spontaneously diffuse through Bergen municipality? Let's all meet across the different SDG courses and discuss around the table to create this student-led arena for sustainability!

Practical information: this workshop will be hybrid, with group discussions on the potentialities and the feasibility of such an event, either around the table or in break-out rooms for people attending digitally. For each group/room, a moderator will guide the exchanges and will summarise the main outputs for the different sessions. We will use interactive tools (e.g. Menti, Miro) to make the discussions more dynamic and easiest for everyone to provide inputs.

Organiser: Morgane Kerdoncuff, PhD (PhD project). I work on grazing systems in the Nordhordland Biosphere Reserve, and more particularly on how different managements and types of livestock affect biodiversity (plant communities, beetle assemblages) and ecosystem services delivery (fodder production, carbon storage…). I am also teaching assistant on SDG215 (Life on Land) and BIO300A (Academic writing) courses, and lab assistant on BIO201 (Ecology) and BIO241 (Behavioural ecology) courses.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 
SDG 4: Quality Education 
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy 
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities 
SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption 
SDG 13: Climate Action 
SDG 14: Life Below Water 
SDG 15: Life on Land 
SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Implementing Convivial Energy Technologies  

Shayan Shokrgozar and Siddharth Sareen, Department of Geography, UiB
shayan.shokrgozar@uib.no   

Environmental change has hit a pace without analogy. Fossil fuel combustion has become a major driver of anthropogenic climate change. The roll-out of lower-carbon energy infrastructures to replace existing energy systems is central to decarbonisation and constitutes an opportunity to involve formerly marginalised members of society.

Empirics bring into question both the extent of energy transitions – as humanity burns more fossil fuels every year – and the roll-out of lower-carbon energy, which has created new or exacerbated existing environmental injustices from extraction to decommissioning. As affluent world economies pursue growth-driven agendas (e.g., SDG 8), and developmental efforts with questionable socio-ecological consequences, new energy infrastructures are implemented without much consideration, premised on their entanglements with the dominant modality.

Workshop participants will explore how to implement energy technologies in ways that justify harnessing vital flows (e.g. sun & wind) to produce renewable energy. Contributors will draw on manuscripts under development for a special issue of the Norwegian Journal of Geography.

This event is relevant for:
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy