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News archive for Climate Dynamics

At the Shanghai-ranking 2018, the field Oceanography at the University of Bergen is ranked number ten in the world. That pleases Professor in Oceanography at UiB and The Bjerknes Centre, Ilker Fer, who recently returned from the first expedition in the Nansen Legacy research project.
Lea Svendsen was at first surprised to see how the Pacific impacted winter temperatures in the Arctic. Now, her results have been published in Nature Climate Change, while the Pacific transitions into a warm phase again.
The Arctic is about to shrink, shows a new study, as an important part of the Arctic Ocean shifts over to an Atlantic climate regime. The rapid climate shift occurs in the northern Barents Sea—the Arctic warming hotspot where the surface warming and loss of winter sea ice is largest in the entire Arctic.
With global warming, ocean circulation in the Atlantic Ocean is generally thought to weaken. New research shows that less sea ice off the coast of Greenland may work against this.
Climate researcher Hans Christian Steen-Larsen has for many years explored some of the most extreme environments on Earth, in his search to improve our climate models. If he succeeds with his new ERC-project, it will have great impact on todays climate research.
Sea surface temperature in the distant tropical Pacific can influence November weather in Europe.
A long debate of the role of the sea ice and the winter temperatures in Eurasia has got a new contribution. Probably no connection, a new study says.
Access to clean and affordable energy is essential to eradicate poverty, end hunger and combat climate change, but do we need to change the way we think about energy?
On TV weather maps we see low pressure centers as circles resembling tree-rings, with long tails of red warm fronts and blue cold fronts. But what came first – the low or the fronts?
Social anthropologist Edvard Hviding is one of three University of Bergen researchers to receive five years of major funding from the prestigious Toppforsk programme, awarded by the Research Council of Norway, for his project Mare Nullius.
Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg has established an international high-level panel for a sustainable ocean economy. The University of Bergen looks forward to being part of this marine effort and contribute with scientific advice.
Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council for excellent research projects.
The Geophysical Institute is a hundred years in 2017. In October, the centenary was celebrated with a scientific symposium on climate, energy and geophysics.
On Fridtjof Nansen's birthday, Elin Darelius was awarded by the Fram committee for her polar science, shared with Jan Inge Faleide at UiO.
That the ocean slows down global warming by absorbing CO2 from the air, is pure chemistry. But to find out how much, you have to know how the ocean moves. Friederike Fröb's PhD shows that both weather and ocean currents play a role.
Professor Peter M. Haugan has long participated in high level work in the United Nations, building partnerships between science and diplomacy.
The distrution of a radioactive Thorium isotope is important in multiple aspects of oceanograpy. In his new single author publication, Yiming Luo has revisited the issue on processes influencing the distribution in the water column.
Climate change in the Arctic and the Antarctic was the topic when around sixty scientists from Japan and Norway gathered in Bergen this week.

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