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News archive for Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities

Six leading scientists give perspectives on UK science after Brexit in the Guardian. Andrea Saltelli and Silvio Funtowicz who both work at the Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities (SVT), are among them.
Jeroen van der Sluijs studies the use of scientific facts in policy making. He is now in the final round in the competition of becoming a Norwegian Centre of Excellence (SFF).
Associate Professor at SVT, Jan Reinert Karlsen was invited by the Norwegian Student Organisation (NSO) to speak about the importance of student involvement in shaping education.
Director of the SVT, prof Matthias Kaiser, participates at this International Research Roundtable that focuses on the ethical challenges of herring food webs and value chains. Herring food webs connect diverse ecological species with different functions within marine ecosystems. Similarly, herring value chains connect multiple social actors who may interact directly, at a local fish market, or... Read more
Under the subject “Teaching Responsible Research and Innovation at University”, the conference gathered more than 150 people from all over the world. Lecturers and attendees discussed about how research and innovation should respond to the needs of society and how universities can contribute towards a responsible scientific education
Four research centres at the University of Bergen have gone to the second round in the process of becoming a Norwegian Centre of Excellence.
As one of the leading groups of post-normal science, researchers from SVT are heavily represented at the conference "New Currents in Science: The Challenges of Quality" in Ispra 3 -5 of March, organized by the Joint Research Centre, European Commision.
Researchers from the SVT has contributed heavily to the new issue of Food Phreaking. In Vitro Meat was one of the case studies in the EPINET project integrating different ways of assessing the good and the bad of new technologies.
14-15 January 2016, Roger Strand (SVT and CCBIO) took part in two events organized by the Initiative for the Humanistic Study of Innovation at Indiana University in Bloomington, US.
To support the efforts of the UN Conference on Climate Change 2015 (COP 21) in Paris, the Editors-in-Chief of Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (COSUST) have organized a Virtual Special Issue focusing on climate change. Professor Jeroen van der Sluijs from UiB is one of the selected contributors.
Soon you will be identified by body odour and your behaviour in public places. UiB researchers investigate the public's feelings about a higher degree of identification.
The European Union recently published a new expert group report called "Indicators for promoting and monitoring Responsible Research and Innovation". The expert group was chaired by Roger Strand, professor at the Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities and the CCBIO, University of Bergen.
Is new technology always a good idea? Or should we as a society think twice before we start using technologies and applications that are presented as new and revolutionary? And how can different types of knowledge play a part when we assess the actual value of new technology?
The Council of Europe, with its 47 member states, has for years been involved in international efforts for human rights and bioethics. In particular, it is known for the so-called Oviedo Convention that outlines ethical principles for biomedicine.
In December 2014 SVT organized a mini-symbosium focusing on post-normal science. If you are interested to see more of the symposium, please follow the links at the right of this side.
Zora Kovacic is a visiting phd fellow from Univeristat Autònoma de Barcelona for three months at SVT. The title for her project is "The use of quantitative science for governance: How to assess the promises of a sustainable future"
Bergen inception meeting: 2 June 2014

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