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News archive for The University Gardens

The labyrinth at the Botanical Garden will be closed to the public while we replace plants and soil
You are welcome to join us for exciting and informative events at the Arboretum, Botanical Garden, and Museum Garden.
At Bergen Botanical Garden you can see a new solar-powered street lamp.
Species that with human help are spreading outside their natural range are called 'invasive'. Such species are considered one of the greatest threats to biodiversity worldwide.
“We must pull together as a global community to limit ongoing loss of biodiversity” says Michael Pirie, of UiB’s University Gardens.
Tomorrow marks the launch of our 'pole hunt' at the Arboretum and Botanical Garden. Visit us, explore, and find out something new - and not just on the poles!
"Icookpopup" is the new cafe at Bergen Botanical Garden.
Welcome to the decorative greenery sale at Milde. Make a wreath or decorate with winter green from the forest in the Arboretum (just follow the infection control rules and keep your distance)
On Thursday 1 October, the City Councilor for Climate, Environment and Urban Development, Thor Haakon Bakke, will reopen Vågelva after an extensive clean-up. Now we welcome sea trout back to Vågelva to spawn.
The rhododendron collection in Nydalen has received new signs with QR codes. More collections will follow.
The mushroom season is underway in many places, and many will use their free time to harvest the field's crops. Although there are not that many mushrooms in the Arboretum yet, we have started mushroom control for those who may find mushrooms elsewhere.
The University Gardens have received official accreditation from Botanic Gardens Conservation International as conforming to the highest international standards.
The latest issue of our Norwegian-language in-house journal Årringen is now available.
The café re-opens with sales through the window from Palm Sunday onwards
The main evolutionary lineages of cinquefoils are investigated in this recently published open access article from the Rosaceae Evolution research group at the University of Bergen.
The gardens remain open, but in the interests of public safety many of our events are no longer taking place.
That trees like spruce and hemlock are uprooted in the Arboretum is not that important, but it is much worse when the storm takes a big bite out of the valuable collection of robles (Nothofagus). The valley of robles is now a shadow of its former self.

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