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Bibliometrics group at the University Library

Bibliometric analysis

The Bibliometrics group at the University of Bergen Library provides analyses and advice related to publishing activity, metrics and researcher visibility.

The Bibliometrics group at the University of Bergen Library provides analyses and advice related to publishing activity, metrics and researcher visibility. The group is represented in UiB's "analysegruppe”, the BOA team, national committees and projects for bibliometrics.

On our webpage about publishing statistics (norwegian) we show analyses of publishing at UiB, its faculties and institutes. This includes aspects such as changes over time, national and international cooperation, and open access. As part of the BOA team, the Bibliometrics group also gives advice on how to increase researcher visibility and research impact. We can help with updates of publication lists and provide information about relevant metrics.

Contact us if you have questions related to publishing activity at UiB, need help with your own publication list, or advice on how to improve your impact.

Below you can find an overview of typical anlyses we can assist with. A bibliometric analysis cannot replace peer-review and should not be used in a simplistic way to draw conclusions about scientific quality, however, when used appropriately, it can contribute to understanding trends or informing strategic decisions. You can read the library’s principles for responsible use of bibliometrics below.

Analyses

Recently our analyses have included (but were not limited to) the following themes. Our analyses are mostly based on data from CRIStin (the Current research information system in Norway) but we also use data from Web of Science (Clarivate Analytics), Altmetrics, Unpaywall and the Leiden ranking.

Publishing activity

  • Trends in co-publishing between UiB/faculties/institutes and certain institutions/countries

  • Publication/co-citation network analysis

  • Citation analysis, finding highly cited publications

  • Finding publications which resulted from certain projects

  • Publishing activity by type of position at a particular faculty

  • Bibliometric mapping of research contributing to the UN's Sustainable Development Goals

  • Bibliometric mapping of UiBs priority areas (Global challenges, Marine research, Climate and Energy transitions)

Several of these analyses are available to view on the publishing statistics website.

CVs and Proposals

  • Finding number of citations and other relevant measures of research impact such as views/mentions

  • Finding h-index

Contact us if you have questions related to publishing activity at UiB, need help with your own publication list, or advice on how to improve your impact.

Principles for responsible use of bibliometrics at the University of Bergen Library

Bibliometric analysis is a quantitative method which is used to analyse research publications and their citations. These analyses can be used to map publishing activity for institutions and research environments, as well as reveal co-publishing relationships and give an indication of a publications impact.

The analyses are mainly based on national research information systems (CRIS - current research information systems) and international abstract and citation databases.

A bibliometric analysis should not replace peer-review or be used in a simplistic way to draw conclusions about scientific quality. However, when used appropriately, it can contribute when making strategic decisions and or during an evaluation process.

These guidelines therefore describe some priciples for responsible use of bibliometrics. These are built on national guidelines, the DORA declatation and the Leiden Manifesto. The Bibliometrics group at the University Library uses these principles as a basis in their work.

Data quality and Reliability

  1. All data sources have their limitations. Ensure that limitations or challenges relating to the analysis and the data it is based on are clearly and openly stated. The data used for analysis should be chosen based on the goal of the analysis.

Openness and Transparancy  

  1. The data used for analysis should be made available when possible, taking into consideration of GDPR and practical limitations (e.g. dataset size).
     
  2. The persons who ordered the analysis should be consulted during the analysis. The aims of the analysis should be defined, and risk of inappropriate use should be minimised. 
     
  3. As a rule, analyses should be carried out in consultation with those who are being evaluated, particularly in cases where results of the bibliometric analysis will be used as a basis for an evaluation.

Choice of indicators

  1. Take into account variations in publishing practices between different academic environments. Citation analyses can only be performed for academic environments/subject areas that have high coverage in available citation databases. Publications limited to national outreach/use and non-English language publications can be poorly represented in available data sources. This should be taken into account in any analysis/evaluation.
     
  2. Evaluate the size of the group to be analysed against the robustness/appropriateness of possible indicators. For example, publication points (norwegian system) should not be used for individual researchers or small groups.
     
  3. Avoid using indicators that are inappropiate for the goals or target group of the analysis. For example, journal bibliometric indicators (JIF, nivå) are appropriate for journals - not individual researchers, individual articles or small groups.
     
  4. When possible, prefer use of simple indicators over weighted and composite indicators. Composite indicators such as publication points (norwegian system) can obscure relationships between factors.
     
  5. Use more than one indicator to reveal different dimensions of the data, its context, and increase the robustness of the analysis.