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The Department of Biomedicine

News archive for The Department of Biomedicine

In the elective subject ELMED219, father and son Lundervold give an introduction to the secret of artificial intelligence and how it can be used in clinical work.
Monica Hellesviks winning poster “NAA80 knockout cells: Fast and Furious?” scores with elegant simplicity and effective communication of scientific results.
The candidate will give a trial lecture and defend his doctoral thesis with the title: “Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autoimmune diseases: etiological relationships and therapeutic possibilities”
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autoimmune diseases: etiological relationships and therapeutic possibilities
There are over 100 tumor types only in the central nervous system. The Translational Cancer Research Group at the Department of Biomedicine provided data and material for a new diagnostic tool that will make it easier for cancer researchers to see the difference.
The enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase is essential for life. Neurological, psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders occur when its catalytic function is impaired. Researchers at the Department of Biomedicine describe how new insights into the protein might help develop new avenues for treatment.
Thomas Arnesen and Harald Barsnes from the Department of Biomedicine are part of a new european consortium in the field of mass spectrometry based proteomics research. The European Union has awarded 10 million Euro.
Cinderella is a tale of being lifted from obscurity to recognition and significance. A review by young researchers at the Department of Biomedicine highlights the importance of the post-translational modifications of actin.
The Retinal Microcircuits Research Group investigates how neurons in the retina communicate to produce vision. In their latest study, they looked outside the conventional neural circuits and found some unexpected receptor molecules in unexpected locations.
Suicide gene therapy of glioblastoma induces an immunosuppressive microenvironment.
One long-standing question in myelin biochemistry was solved, as a new binding partner specific for the large isoform of MAG was identified.
There is a clear connection between specific genes and ADHD. This is the result of a large international study where UiB-researchers have played an important role, led by Professor Jan Haavik.
Matrix Biology group leader and CCBIO PI Donald Gullberg recently returned from an inspiring conference in China.
The research laboratory for brain cancer immunology and therapy at the Department of Biomedicine has received the secretary general of the Brain-Tumour Society Rolf Ledal to discuss current and future research projects.

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